opensmtpd.org 193 KB

(service (@ (gnu services mail) opensmtpd-service-type) ((@ (gnu services mail) opensmtpd-configuration) (config-file …)))

tasks

PROJ I have decent data structures. now let's get some good code. [0/5]

why are good data structures important?

nckx's advice: use a simple 1-1 mapping

"...as I think Guix services ought to faithfully wrap the native syntax whenever possible (implement alternative simple APIs on top of that — fine)."

-nckx from irc on #guix

To follow nckx's advice, one might create the <opensmtpd-service> like this:


  (service opensmtpd-service
           (opensmtpd-configuration
            (includes ...)
            (tables ...)
            (pkis ...)
            (filters ...)
            (listen-on ...)
            (actions ...)
            (matches ...)))

Defining the service this way, makes it VERY easy from a development point of view. But it makes it possible for users to create simple mistakes when defining the service.

For example, it is possible to define an nginx service that will successfully reconfigure the system. BUT after reboot nginx refuses to start. Why? Who knows. Guix won't tell you. Neither will the Shepherd. To fix this, the user has to go digging into the nginx logs, and he might not know where to find those. If possible, when the user specificies a <opensmtpd-configuration> that has obvious errors, then the guix services should make reconfigure fail and print a helpful error message.

Example configuration


(service opensmtpd-service-type
         (let ([interface "lo"]
               [creds-table (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                             (name "creds")
                             (data
                              (list
                               (cons "joshua"
                                     "$6$Ec4m8FgKjT2F/03Y$k66ABdse9TzCX6qaALB3WBL9GC1rmAWJmaoSjFMpbhzat7DOpFqpnOwpbZ34wwsQYIK8RQlqwM1I/v6vsRq86."))))]
               [receive-action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
                                (name "receive")
                                (method (opensmtpd-maildir-configuration
                                         (pathname "/home/%{rcpt.user}/Maildir")
                                         (junk #t)))
                                (virtual (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                                          (name "virtual")
                                          (data (list "josh" "jbranso@dismail.de")))))]
               ;; as of 7-24-22 this proc fieldname does not actually work, but is proper syntax.
               [filter-dkimsign (opensmtpd-filter-configuration
                                 (name "dkimsign")
                                 (exec #t)
                                 (proc (list (file-append opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign")
                                             " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k "
                                             "/etc/dkim/private.key "
                                             "user nobody group nogroup")))]
               [filter-invalid-fcrdns (opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration
                                       (name "invalid-fcrdns")
                                       (phase "connect")
                                       (options
                                        (list (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                                               (option "fcrdns")
                                               (not #t))))
                                       (decision "reject")
                                       (message "422 No valid fcrdns."))]
               [smtp.gnucode.me (opensmtpd-pki-configuration
                                 (domain "smtp.gnucode.me")
                                 (cert "guix.scm")
                                 (key "guix.scm"))])
           (opensmtpd-configuration
            (mta-max-deferred 50)
            (queue
             (opensmtpd-queue-configuration
              (compression #t)))
            (smtp
             (opensmtpd-smtp-configuration
              (max-message-size "10M")))
            (srs
             (opensmtpd-srs-configuration
              (ttl-delay "5d")))
            (listen-ons
             (list
              (opensmtpd-interface
               (interface interface)
               (port 25)
               (secure-connection "tls")
               (filters (list filter-invalid-fcrdns))
               (pki smtp.gnucode.me))
              ;; this lets local users logged into the system via ssh send email
              ;; be sure to dkimsign them.
              (opensmtpd-interface
               (interface interface)
               (port 465)
               (secure-connection "smtps")
               (pki smtp.gnucode.me)
               (auth creds-table)
               (filters (list filter-dkimsign)))
              ;; send out emails and be sure to dkimsign them.
              (opensmtpd-interface
               (interface interface)
               (port 587)
               (secure-connection "tls-require")
               (pki smtp.gnucode.me)
               (auth creds-table)
               (filters (list filter-dkimsign)))))
            (matches (list
                      (opensmtpd-match-configuration
                       (action (opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration
                                (name "relay")))
                       (options (list (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                                       (option "for any"))
                                      (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                                       (option "from any"))
                                      (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                                       (option "auth")))))
                      (opensmtpd-match-configuration
                       (action receive-action)
                       (options (list (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                                       (option "from any"))
                                      (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                                       (option "for domain")
                                       (data (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                                              (name "domain-table")
                                              (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))))
                      (opensmtpd-match-configuration
                       (action receive-action)
                       (options (list (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                                       (option "for local"))))))))))

:OldConfigurationSyntax:


  (service opensmtpd-service-type
               (opensmtpd-configuration
                (pkis (list
                       (opensmtpd-pki-configuration
                        ...)))
                (tables (list
                         (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                          ...)
                         (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                          ...)))
                (listen-ons
                 (list
                  (opensmtpd-interface
                   ...)
                  (opensmtpd-interface
                   ...)))
                (actions
                 (list
                  (opensmtpd-action
                     ...)
                  (opensmtpd-action
                   ...)))
                (matches (list
                          (opensmtpd-match-configuration
                           ...)
                          (opensmtpd-match-configuration
                           ...)))
                (filter-chains
                 (list
                  (opensmtpd-filter-chain
                   (name "dropDumbEmails")
                   (filter-names (list "nofcrdnsDisconnect"
                                       "nordnsDisconnect")))))
                (filter-phases
                 (list (opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration
                        ...)
                       (opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration
                        ...)))))

Here you have to define the =pki=s twice! You define it once in the =pkis= section, and then you reference it later. This could potentially cause a mispelling error. That would be silly to debug as an end-user.

:END:

BUT it would be better if the service uses better datastructures.

I should follow nckx's advice, and Linus' advice: good programmers use good datastructures. If you have good datastructures, then your code will almost write itself.

It might make the service a little harder to develop, but end-users will find the service easier to use. This would eliminate common errors like misspellings and give appropriate error messages. Practically it would ensure each == has a corresponding <opensmtpd-action>, creating a table name and then misspelling the table name later, and defining a table but never using it, etc.

PROJ tweek the code for <opensmtpd-filter-configuration> & <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration> records [2/5]

Why I chose the current datastructures of <opensmtpd-filter-configuration> & <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration>

According to the man page I have a four kinds of filters:


1. filter chain-name chain {filter-name [, ...]}
         Register a chain of filters chain-name, consisting of the filters listed from filter-name.
         Filters part of a filter chain are executed in order of declaration for each phase that
         they are registered for.  A filter chain may be used in place of a filter for any direc‐
         tive but filter chains themselves.
2. filter filter-name phase phase-name match conditions decision
         Register a filter filter-name.  A decision about what to do with the mail is taken at
         phase phase-name when matching conditions.  Phases, matching conditions, and decisions are
         described in MAIL FILTERING, below.
3. filter filter-name proc proc-name
         Register "proc" filter filter-name backed by the proc-name process.
4. filter filter-name proc-exec command
         Register and execute "proc" filter filter-name from command.  If command starts with a
         slash it is executed with an absolute path, else it will be run from
         “/gnu/store/2d13sdz76ldq8zgwv4wif0zx7hkr3mh2-opensmtpd-6.8.0p2/libexec/opensmtpd”.

some example code for each of the 4 types of filters

  1. filter phase

(opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration
 (name "phase")
 (phase "connect")
 (options
  (list
   (opensmtpd-option-configuration
    (option "src")
    (not #t)
    (regex #t)
    (table (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "src-option-table")
                            (data (list "cat" "hot")))))))
 (decision "reject")
 (message "We do not want spam here!"))
  1. filter proc
  2. this is a filter-proc

(opensmtpd-filter (name "proc") (proc "dkimsign")


  1. filter proc-exec

(opensmtpd-filter
 (name "proc")
 (exec #t)
 (proc "dkimsign"))
  1. filter chains
  2. =chain-name= could be easily represented as a list of filters. in the opensmtpd-configuration-filter fieldname:

(opensmtpd-configuration
 (listen-on
  (filter
   (list (opensmtpd-filter-configuration)
         (opensmtpd-filter-configuration)
         (opensmtpd-filter-configuration)))))
Why am I doing the data structure like the above?

filter-proc and proc-exec as defined in man smtpd.conf can both use the same record. That works just fine.

But filter-phase is a different beast. I do NOT want someone to accidentally define something like the following which is BAD data:


(opensmtpd-filter
 (name "proc")
 (exec #t)
 (proc "dkimsign"))

NO Is it advantageous/desireable to merge <opensmtpd-filter-configuration> &

When a user creates a filter, he is either going to create a =~ or an ~= NOT both. If we define separate records, then it is impossible for a user to accidentally define a filter record using fieldnames from both filter types. eg:


(opensmtpd-filter-configuration
 (name "filter")
 (exec #t)
 (proc "dkimsign")
 (phase "connect"))  ;; this phase should NOT be there. this is a <opensmtpd-filter-configuration>

TODO what does rewrite needs value mean? Should it be a number? this is for <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration>

If <opensmtpd-filter-configuration> & <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration> are separte then the above would correctly result in an error message for free. from the documentation

rewrite value the command parameter is rewritten with value

NO use an opensmtpd-include-configuration to get dkimsigning to work

This won't work, because I have NOT designed opensmtpd-filter-configuration to work with include-configuration.


(opensmtpd-include-configuration
 (name "dkimsign")
 (proc
  (mixed-text-file "dkimsign"
                   "filter \"dkimsign\" "
                   (file-append opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign")
                   " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k "
                   "/etc/dkim/private.key "
                   "user nobody group nogroup"))
 (exec #t))

(opensmtpd-filter-configuration ;; this is invalid.  proc must be of type string.
 (name "dkimsign")
 (proc #f))

PROJ enable to do dkimsigning or bogofilter

There are 2 ways to do this:

1) <opensmtpd-filter-configuration> fieldname 'proc' to be a list of strings and/or gexps.

2) NOT THIS ONE <opensmtpd-filter-configuration fieldname 'proc' to be a string or mixed-text-file.

Which shall I choose?

1 is easier on the user of the opensmtpd-service. 2 is easier on the developer of the service.

:relevantIrcChatsANDExampleCode:

gnucode │ hey guix, I am working on setting up dkimsigning for my opensmtpd-records. When one does guix package install opensmtpd-filer-dkimsign; man 5 smtpd.conf, the man page shows this command: https://paste.debian.net/1246665/ gnucode │ essentially the private key for dkimsigning is in the /gnu/store, which is world readable. That documentation must be inaccurate right? jpoiret │ right, the private key could not be put there anyways since the store is ro jpoiret │ i think it's just that the man page is generated from a template that just inserts {etcdir}/private.key or something similar gnucode │ jpoiret: can you give me some tips how I could let users set up an opensmtpd-service with dkimsigning, and let the service take care of copying the private key to /etc ? I would use etc-service-type right? jpoiret │ and since in guix the etcdir (or whatever it's called) is automagically set to the package output's, that's the reason gnucode │ 56046 is the buy numberfor me opensmtpd-records by the way. jpoiret │ i don't think you should let the service handle moving the key anywhere gnucode │ jpoiret: really? that would make my life easier. jpoiret │ i think the service configuration should hold the absolute path to the key jpoiret │ and it's the user's responsibility to place it somewhere safe gnucode │ ok. What is "best practices" for users to put it somewhere safe? I'm thinking "/etc/opensmtpd/dkim/private.key" jpoiret │ otherwise, an activation service that just does (copy-file path "/etc/dkim/private.key") jpoiret │ gnucode: depends on the system imo vivien │ gnucode, maybe the file name should indicate "dkim", "sign" but not "opensmtpd" (because it’s not specific to opensmtpd) jpoiret │ sometimes you don't want anybody to have access to the file, sometimes you want your single user to have access to it, etc... jpoiret │ at least, have a-rwx gnucode │ ok. Should the private.key only be readable by user "nobody" or user "dkim" ? gnucode │ jpoiret: that activation service would use etc-service-type right? gnucode │ to copy the file to /etc/dkim/private.key ? vivien │ gnucode, wouldn’t that put the key in the store? That would be bad. gnucode │ vivien: I am justing to figure out how to do "otherwise, an activation service that just does (copy-file path "/etc/dkim/private.key")" gnucode │ I am not certain where/how I would do that... let me grep the guix source code gnucode │ looks like prosody has an example for me. gnucode │ hang on... does guix let copy files to /etc inside a gexp? I thought a gexp represented a containerized build environment...one in which you could not access the filesystem. vivien │ If the key is an input of a gexp, it will be copied in the store, anyone will be able to read the file. gnucode │ vivien: I guess I do not know what the "input of a gexp" means. But I gather it means don't use etc-service-type. :) gnucode │ I'll just take a look at the prosody code example. jpoiret │ gexps can represent plain scripts jpoiret │ so the script will be built in the store, but run normally outside of a container jpoiret │ (program-file "name" gexp) lets you generate those iirc

Example gexp to copy a file from home/joshua/prog/gnu/guix/guix-config/linode-guix-system-configuration


(let ((etc-dkimsign-key-file "filename.key")
      (path-to-dkimsign-key "/etc/opensmtpd/"))
  (opensmtpd-filter-configuration
   (name "dkimsign")
   (proc (mixed-text-file "dkimsign"
          (file-append opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign")
          " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k "
          ~#(let ([UID-nobody (passwd:uid (getpw "nobody"))]
                  [GID-root (group:gid (getgr "root"))]
                  [GID-nogroup (group:gid (getgr "nogroup"))])
              ;; #o550 user root can read/open the directory
              ;; and the group "root" can read/open the directory.
              ;; change these two lines to (mkdir-p) ?
              (unless (file-exists? "/etc/opensmtpd")
                (mkdir "/etc/opensmtpd" #o550))

              ;; root can read/write/execute on directory dkimsign
              ;; group "root" can read and execute
              (unless (file-exists? "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign")
                (mkdir "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign" #o750))

              (copy-file path-to-dkimsign-key (string-append (getcwd) "guix.scm"))
              ;; make the etc-dkimsign-key-file to owned by nobody and group nogroup.
              (chown "/etc/opensmtpd" UID-nobody GID-root)
              (chown "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign" UID-nobody GID-root)
              (chown etc-dkimsign-key-file UID-nobody GID-nogroup)
              "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign/guix.scm")
          "user nobody group nogroup"))
   (exec #t)))

:END: :MacroThatisNOTaGoodSolution:


(define-syntax-rule (opensmtpd-filter-configuration->mixed-text-file
                     filter)
  (mixed-text-file (opensmtpd-filter-configuration-name filter)
                   (string-append "filter " (opensmtpd-filter-configuration-name filter) " \"")
                   (opensmtpd-filter-configuration-proc filter)
                   "\""))

This 1/9 works! But it currently assumes that the user writes the record type in this order: name, proc, exec. Also it won't work the below. assume x is a valid opensmtpd-filter-configuration record.


(opensmtpd-filter-configuration->mixed-text-file x)

:END:

TODO <opensmtpd-filter-configuration> fieldname 'proc' to be a list of strings and/or gexps.

This code example may be really helpful! prosodyActivationCopyingFilesToEtc

Suppose you want to do dkimsigning in smtpd.conf. Here is how you might define the official opensmtpd dkimsign filter. Note irc said that the service should NOT copy the private key to the /etc/dkim/private.key, but that I can use an activation like the above prosody link to do that.


(opensmtpd-filter-configuration
 (name "dkimsign")
 (proc (list (file-append opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign")
             " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k "
             "/etc/dkim/private.key "
             "user nobody group nogroup"))
 (exec #t))

This is a bad working solution.


(define (opensmtpd-filter-configuration->mixed-text-file filter)
  (primitive-eval
   `(mixed-text-file .
                     (,(opensmtpd-filter-configuration-name filter) .
                      (,(string-append "filter "
                                       (opensmtpd-filter-configuration-name filter) " \"")  .
                                       (,@(opensmtpd-filter-configuration-proc filter) .
                                        ( "\"" . () )))))))

The above produces:


(mixed-text-file "dkimsign"
                   "filter \"dkimsign\" "
                   (file-append opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign")
                   " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k "
                   "/etc/dkim/private.key "
                   "user nobody group nogroup")

The above code would need to be converted into a final string that looks like:


filter \"dkimsign\"  \
  proc-exec "/gnu/store/aseuhsanehusnatuh/opensmtpd/libexec/filter-dkimsign -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k  /etc/opensmtpd/etc-dkimsign-key-file.key  user nobody group nogroup"

A better solution would be to use apply!


(apply mixed-text-file list-of-gexps-or-strings)
NO <opensmtpd-filter-configuration fieldname 'proc' to be a string or mixed-text-file.

This is how a user might before an OpenSMTDP filter. Proc is a string, list of strings and/or gexps.


(opensmtpd-filter-configuration
 (name "dkimsign")
 (proc (mixed-text-file "dkimsign"
                        "filter \"dkimsign2\" proc-exec \""
                        (file-append opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign")
                        " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k "
                        "/etc/dkim/private.key "
                        "user nobody group nogroup"))
 (exec #t))

The above code would need to be converted into:


(opensmtpd-filter-configuration
 (name "dkimsign")
 (proc (mixed-text-file "dkimsign"
                        "filter \"dkimsign2\" proc-exec \""
                        (file-append opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign")
                        " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k "
                        "/etc/dkim/private.key "
                        "user nobody group nogroup"
                        "\""))
 (exec #t))

include "/gnu/store/nahusntaae/dkimsign"


filter \"dkimsign2\"  \
  proc-exec "/gnu/store/aseuhsanehusnatuh/opensmtpd/libexec/filter-dkimsign -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k  /etc/opensmtpd/etc-dkimsign-key-file.key  user nobody group nogroup"

For example my hacky code to do dkimsigning looks like in my linode configuration opensmtpd.scm:

:opensmtpdFile:


cat opensmtpd.scm

(define-module (opensmtpd)
  #:use-module (guix gexp)
  #:use-module (guix records)
  #:use-module (gnu packages mail) ;;for finding location of filter-dkimsign
  #:export (
            %smtpd.conf
            ))


;; to create credentials for now, I need to do the following:
;;  find /gnu/store -name '*encrypt*' | grep opensmtpd
;; /gnu/store/blah/opensmtpd/encrypt
(define creds
  (plain-file "creds"
              ;; this is my joshua's password for server.  This can be found on dobby's /home/joshua/.authinfo/
              "joshua $6$Ec4m8FgKjT2F/03Y$k66ABdse9TzCX6qaALB3WBL9GC1rmAWJmaoSjFMpbhzat7DOpFqpnOwpbZ34wwsQYIK8RQlqwM1I/v6vsRq86."))

(define vdoms
  (plain-file
   "vdoms"
   "gnucode.me
gnu-hurd.com"))

(define vusers
  (plain-file
   "vusers"
   "joshua@gnucode.me  joshua
jbranso@gnucode.me     joshua
postmaster@gnucode.me  joshua"))

(define path-to-filter-dkimsign
  (file-append opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign"))

(define path-to-dkimsign-key (string-append (getcwd) "/email-dkim-ssh-keys/2021-09-22-rsa1024-gnucode.me.key"))
(define etc-dkimsign-key-file "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign/2021-09-22-rsa1024-gnucode.me.key")

;; FIXME:  This should become a derivation.  Currently it just runs when I evaluate
;; %smtpd.conf.  For example it should look like this?
;; (define build-exp
;;   #~(begin
;;       (mkdir #$output)
;;       (chdir #$output)
;;       (symlink (string-append #$coreutils "/bin/ls")
;;                "list-files")))

;; I will need to extend the opensmtpd service, to create a directory
;; in etc.  This line needs to be added to etc-service.
;; (service-extension etc-service-type opensmtpd-etc-service)
;; I'll then need to create a opensmtpd-etc-service procedure.  ganeti has
;; a good example.

;; It should also use the /etc service, which is a service for creating
;; directories and files in /etc ?
(define (create-etc-dkimsign-key-file)
  #~(let ([UID-nobody (passwd:uid (getpw "nobody"))]
          [GID-root (group:gid (getgr "root"))]
          [GID-nogroup (group:gid (getgr "nogroup"))])
    ;; #o550 user root can read/open the directory
    ;; and the group "root" can read/open the directory.
    ;; change these two lines to (mkdir-p) ?
      (unless (file-exists? "/etc/opensmtpd")
        (mkdir "/etc/opensmtpd" #o550))

      ;; root can read/write/execute on directory dkimsign
      ;; group "root" can read and execute
      (unless (file-exists? "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign")
        (mkdir "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign" #o750))

      (copy-file path-to-dkimsign-key etc-dkimsign-key-file)
      ;; ;; ;; make the etc-dkimsign-key-file to owned by nobody and group nogroup.
      (chown "/etc/opensmtpd" UID-nobody GID-root)
      (chown "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign" UID-nobody GID-root)
      (chown etc-dkimsign-key-file UID-nobody GID-nogroup)
      etc-dkimsign-key-file))

(define %smtpd.conf
  (mixed-text-file "smtpd.conf"
                   "
# This is the smtpd server system-wide configuration file.
# See smtpd.conf(5) for more information.
# borrowed from the archlinux guix
# https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/OpenSMTPD#Simple_OpenSMTPD/mbox_configuration

# My TLS certificate and key
table aliases file:/etc/aliases
pki smtp.gnucode.me cert \"/etc/letsencrypt/live/gnucode.me/fullchain.pem\"
pki smtp.gnucode.me key \"/etc/letsencrypt/live/gnucode.me/privkey.pem\"

# for now I am NOT using the virtual credentials
# table creds { joshua = $6$Ec4m8FgKjT2F/03Y$k66ABdse9TzCX6qaALB3WBL9GC1rmAWJmaoSjFMpbhzat7DOpFqpnOwpbZ34wwsQYIK8RQlqwM1I/v6vsRq86. }
table creds \"" creds "\"
table vdoms \"" vdoms "\"
# table vdoms { gnucode.me, gnu-hurd.com }
# table vusers { joshua@gnucode.me = joshua, jbranso@gnucode.me = joshua, postmaster@gnucode.me = joshua }
table vusers \"" vusers "\"

# this totally works!  run this as user nobody!
# info about dkimsign ...ing
# https://openports.pl/path/mail/opensmtpd-filters/dkimsign
# sudo -u nobody /gnu/store/g17vdv4l03bacn7qbdpb5v8l8vgdxcld-opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign-0.5/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign -d gnucode.me -s 2020 -c relaxed/relaxed -k etc-dkimsign-key-file /home/joshua/linode-guix-system-configuration/email-dkim-ssh-keys/20201004-gnucode.me.key user nobody group nogroup

filter \"dkimsign\"  \
  proc-exec \"" path-to-filter-dkimsign " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k " etc-dkimsign-key-file ;;(create-etc-dkimsign-key-file)
  " \"  \
  user nobody group nogroup

# port 25 is used only for receiving from external servers, and they may start a
# TLS session if the want.
listen on eth0 port 25 tls pki smtp.gnucode.me

# For sending messages from outside of this server, you need to authenticate and use
# TLS
listen on eth0 port 465 smtps pki smtp.gnucode.me auth <creds> filter \"dkimsign\"
listen on eth0 port 587 tls-require pki smtp.gnucode.me auth <creds> filter \"dkimsign\"

# users logged-in/ssh-ed into the system can send email
listen on lo port 25 tls pki smtp.gnucode.me

# receive email action
action \"receive\" maildir \"/home/%{rcpt.user}/Maildir\" junk virtual <vusers>
# action send the email to the world
action \"send\" relay

# We accept to send email from any mail from authenticated users
match for any from any auth action \"send\"

#finally we receive any incoming email
# maybe the next \"from any\" should be changed to \"for rdns\".
match from any for domain <vdoms> action \"receive\"
match for local action \"receive\""))
(define-module (opensmtpd)
  #:use-module (guix gexp)
  #:use-module (guix records)
  #:use-module (gnu packages mail) ;;for finding location of filter-dkimsign
  #:export (
            %smtpd.conf
            ))


;; to create credentials for now, I need to do the following:
;;  find /gnu/store -name '*encrypt*' | grep opensmtpd
;; /gnu/store/blah/opensmtpd/encrypt
(define creds
  (plain-file "creds"
              ;; this is my joshua's password for server.  This can be found on dobby's /home/joshua/.authinfo/
              "joshua $6$Ec4m8FgKjT2F/03Y$k66ABdse9TzCX6qaALB3WBL9GC1rmAWJmaoSjFMpbhzat7DOpFqpnOwpbZ34wwsQYIK8RQlqwM1I/v6vsRq86."))

(define vdoms
  (plain-file
   "vdoms"
   "gnucode.me
gnu-hurd.com"))

(define vusers
  (plain-file
   "vusers"
   "joshua@gnucode.me  joshua
jbranso@gnucode.me     joshua
postmaster@gnucode.me  joshua"))

(define path-to-filter-dkimsign
  (file-append opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign"))

(define path-to-dkimsign-key (string-append (getcwd) "/email-dkim-ssh-keys/2021-09-22-rsa1024-gnucode.me.key"))
(define etc-dkimsign-key-file "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign/2021-09-22-rsa1024-gnucode.me.key")

;; FIXME:  This should become a derivation.  Currently it just runs when I evaluate
;; %smtpd.conf.  For example it should look like this?
;; (define build-exp
;;   #~(begin
;;       (mkdir #$output)
;;       (chdir #$output)
;;       (symlink (string-append #$coreutils "/bin/ls")
;;                "list-files")))

;; I will need to extend the opensmtpd service, to create a directory
;; in etc.  This line needs to be added to etc-service.
;; (service-extension etc-service-type opensmtpd-etc-service)
;; I'll then need to create a opensmtpd-etc-service procedure.  ganeti has
;; a good example.

;; It should also use the /etc service, which is a service for creating
;; directories and files in /etc ?
(define (create-etc-dkimsign-key-file)
  #~(let ([UID-nobody (passwd:uid (getpw "nobody"))]
          [GID-root (group:gid (getgr "root"))]
          [GID-nogroup (group:gid (getgr "nogroup"))])
    ;; #o550 user root can read/open the directory
    ;; and the group "root" can read/open the directory.
    ;; change these two lines to (mkdir-p) ?
      (unless (file-exists? "/etc/opensmtpd")
        (mkdir "/etc/opensmtpd" #o550))

      ;; root can read/write/execute on directory dkimsign
      ;; group "root" can read and execute
      (unless (file-exists? "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign")
        (mkdir "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign" #o750))

      (copy-file path-to-dkimsign-key etc-dkimsign-key-file)
      ;; ;; ;; make the etc-dkimsign-key-file to owned by nobody and group nogroup.
      (chown "/etc/opensmtpd" UID-nobody GID-root)
      (chown "/etc/opensmtpd/dkimsign" UID-nobody GID-root)
      (chown etc-dkimsign-key-file UID-nobody GID-nogroup)
      etc-dkimsign-key-file))

(define %smtpd.conf
  (mixed-text-file "smtpd.conf"
                   "
# This is the smtpd server system-wide configuration file.
# See smtpd.conf(5) for more information.
# borrowed from the archlinux guix
# https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/OpenSMTPD#Simple_OpenSMTPD/mbox_configuration

# My TLS certificate and key
table aliases file:/etc/aliases
pki smtp.gnucode.me cert \"/etc/letsencrypt/live/gnucode.me/fullchain.pem\"
pki smtp.gnucode.me key \"/etc/letsencrypt/live/gnucode.me/privkey.pem\"

# for now I am NOT using the virtual credentials
# table creds { joshua = $6$Ec4m8FgKjT2F/03Y$k66ABdse9TzCX6qaALB3WBL9GC1rmAWJmaoSjFMpbhzat7DOpFqpnOwpbZ34wwsQYIK8RQlqwM1I/v6vsRq86. }
table creds \"" creds "\"
table vdoms \"" vdoms "\"
# table vdoms { gnucode.me, gnu-hurd.com }
# table vusers { joshua@gnucode.me = joshua, jbranso@gnucode.me = joshua, postmaster@gnucode.me = joshua }
table vusers \"" vusers "\"

# this totally works!  run this as user nobody!
# info about dkimsign ...ing
# https://openports.pl/path/mail/opensmtpd-filters/dkimsign
# sudo -u nobody /gnu/store/g17vdv4l03bacn7qbdpb5v8l8vgdxcld-opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign-0.5/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign -d gnucode.me -s 2020 -c relaxed/relaxed -k etc-dkimsign-key-file /home/joshua/linode-guix-system-configuration/email-dkim-ssh-keys/20201004-gnucode.me.key user nobody group nogroup

filter \"dkimsign\"  \
  proc-exec \"" path-to-filter-dkimsign " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k " etc-dkimsign-key-file ;;(create-etc-dkimsign-key-file)
  " \"  \
  user nobody group nogroup

# port 25 is used only for receiving from external servers, and they may start a
# TLS session if the want.
listen on eth0 port 25 tls pki smtp.gnucode.me

# For sending messages from outside of this server, you need to authenticate and use
# TLS
listen on eth0 port 465 smtps pki smtp.gnucode.me auth <creds> filter \"dkimsign\"
listen on eth0 port 587 tls-require pki smtp.gnucode.me auth <creds> filter \"dkimsign\"

# users logged-in/ssh-ed into the system can send email
listen on lo port 25 tls pki smtp.gnucode.me

# receive email action
action \"receive\" maildir \"/home/%{rcpt.user}/Maildir\" junk virtual <vusers>
# action send the email to the world
action \"send\" relay

# We accept to send email from any mail from authenticated users
match for any from any auth action \"send\"

#finally we receive any incoming email
# maybe the next \"from any\" should be changed to \"for rdns\".
match from any for domain <vdoms> action \"receive\"
match for local action \"receive\""))

:END:

how to use mixed-text-file and be good!


(opensmtpd-filter-configuration
 (name "dkimsign")
 (proc (list (file-append opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign")
             " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k "
             "/etc/dkim/private.key "
             "user nobody group nogroup"))
 (exec #t))
TODO tweak opensmtpd-filters->string to allow filter records, whose procs are a list of strings and/or gexps.
[?] sanitize opensmtpd-filter-configuration-proc should the error message show the number 5?

This is a bad record. The 5 is NOT allowed.


(opensmtpd-filter-configuration
 (name "dkimsign")
 (proc (list (file-append opensmtpd-filter-dkimsign "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign")
             " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k "
             5
             "/etc/dkim/private.key "
             "user nobody group nogroup"))
 (exec #t))
  fieldname: 'proc' is of type string, or a list of strings or gexps.

 ice-9/boot-9.scm:1685:16: In procedure raise-exception:
 Throw to key `bad!' with args `((# "/libexec/opensmtpd/filter-dkimsign"> " -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k " 5 "/etc/dkim/private.key " "user nobody group nogroup"))'.

 Entering a new prompt.  Type `,bt' for a backtrace or `,q' to continue.

Should the error message be instead:

  fieldname: 'proc' is of type string, or a list of strings or gexps.  The list includes a number 5.

PROJ by which method should I turn the filters in <opensmtpd-configuration> into strings? [0/0]

I should assume that I will have multiple <opensmtpd-filter-configuration>s with gexps.

I suppose then that I should use ungexp-splicing, just like the below bit of code.


scheme@(gnu services mail) [1]> (define x `(1 2 3))
scheme@(gnu services mail) [1]> `(+ ,@x)
$6 = (+ 1 2 3)

PROJ make fieldnames that need a table accept a value of table [3/4]

DONE opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration [3/3]

DONE alias <alias> [2/2]
DONE change the sanitize portion of the fieldname alias in the
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 03:53]
  • :END:

The below code does work in a REPL.


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

(opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
 (alias
  (opensmtpd-table-configuration
   (name "My-table")
   (data (list "gnu-hurd.com" "gnucode.me")))))
DONE change relevant portions in opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration->string

This bit of code works in the repl too!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

((@@ (opensmtpd-records) opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration->string)
 (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
  (alias
   (opensmtpd-table-configuration
    (name "My-table")
    (data (list "gnu-hurd.com" "gnucode.me"))))))
DONE userbase <users> [2/2]
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 03:53]
  • :END:
DONE change the sanitize portion of the fieldname userbase in the

The below code does work in a REPL.


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))
(opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
 (userbase
  (opensmtpd-table-configuration
   (name "this")
   (data (list "job" "done")))))
DONE change relevant portions in opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration->string

This bit of code works in the repl too!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

((@@ (opensmtpd-records) opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration->string)
 (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
  (userbase
   (opensmtpd-table-configuration
    (name "this")
    (data (list "job" "done"))))))
DONE virtual [2/2]
DONE change the sanitize portion of the fieldname virtual in the
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 03:53]
  • :END:

The below code does work in a REPL.


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))
(opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
 (virtual
  (opensmtpd-table-configuration
   (name "this")
   (data (list "job" "done")))))
DONE change relevant portions in opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration->string

This bit of code works in the repl too!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

((@@ (opensmtpd-records) opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration->string)
 (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
  (virtual
   (opensmtpd-table-configuration
    (name "this")
    (data (list "job" "done"))))))

DONE opensmtpd-relay-configuration [4/4]

DONE helo-src
DONE domain <domains> [2/2]
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:00]
  • :END: :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:00]
  • :END:
DONE change the sanitize portion of the fieldname domain in the

The below code does work in a REPL.


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

(opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration
                           (domain
                            (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                             (name "this")
                             (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com")))))

DONE change relevant portions in opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration->string

This bit of code works in the repl too!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

((@@ (opensmtpd-records) opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration->string)
                          (opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration
                           (domain
                            (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                             (name "this")
                             (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))


DONE auth <credentials> [2/2]
DONE change the sanitize portion of the fieldname <auth> in the
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:00]
  • :END:

The below code does work in a REPL.


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

(opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration
                           (auth
                            (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                             (name "this")
                             (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com")))))

DONE change relevant portions in opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration->string

This bit of code works in the repl too!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

((@@ (opensmtpd-records) opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration->string)
                          (opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration
                           (auth
                            (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                             (name "this")
                             (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))


DONE src srcaddress |
DONE change the sanitize portion of the fieldname <auth> in the
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:01]
  • :END:

The below code does work in a REPL.


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

(opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration
                           (src
                            (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                             (name "this")
                             (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com")))))

DONE change relevant portions in opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration->string

This bit of code works in the repl too!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

((@@ (opensmtpd-records) opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration->string)
                          (opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration
                           (src
                            (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                             (name "this")
                             (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))


DONE opensmtpd-interface [3/3]

DONE auth <credentials> [3/3]
DONE change the sanitize portion of the fieldname 'auth' in the
    Use the string scraddress or list table for the source IP address. :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:01]
  • :END:

The below code does work in a REPL.


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

(opensmtpd-interface
 (auth
  (opensmtpd-table-configuration
   (name "My-table")
   (data '(("joshua" . "$some$Long$EncrytpedPassword"))))))
DONE change relevant portions in opensmtpd-interface->string

This bit of code works in the repl too!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

((@@ (opensmtpd-records) opensmtpd-interface->string)
 (opensmtpd-interface
  (auth
   (opensmtpd-table-configuration
    (name "credentials")
    (data '(("joshua" . "$someLongEncrytpedPassword")))))))
DONE sanitize the <opensmtpd-table-configuration> so that it can only be an opensmtpd-table-configuration, whose fieldname values are an assoc-list

(opensmtpd-interface (auth (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "the") (data (list "the" "cat")))))
DONE auth-optional <credentials> [2/2]
DONE change the sanitize portion of the fieldname 'auth-optional' in the
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:01]
  • :END:

The below code does work in a REPL.


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

(opensmtpd-interface
 (auth
  (opensmtpd-table-configuration
   (name "My-table")
   (data '(("joshua" . "$some$Long$EncrytpedPassword"))))))

AND the below code will correctly result in an error!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

(opensmtpd-interface
 (auth
  (opensmtpd-table-configuration
   (name "My-table")
   (data '("joshua" "$some$Long$EncrytpedPassword")))))
== fieldname: 'auth' is of type boolean, or an == record whose fieldname 'values' are an assoc-list
(eg: (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "table") (data '("joshua" . "$encrypted$password")))).
DONE change relevant portions in opensmtpd-interface->string

This bit of code works in the repl too!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

((@@ (opensmtpd-records) opensmtpd-interface->string)
 (opensmtpd-interface
  (auth
   (opensmtpd-table-configuration
    (name "credentials")
    (data '(("joshua" . "$someLongEncrytpedPassword")))))))
DONE hostnames <hostnames> [2/2]
DONE change the sanitize portion of the fieldname 'hostnames' in the
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:01]
  • :END:

The below code does work in a REPL.


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

(opensmtpd-interface
 (hostnames
  (opensmtpd-table-configuration
   (name "My-table")
   (data '(("joshua" . "$some$Long$EncrytpedPassword"))))))

AND the below code will correctly result in an error!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

(opensmtpd-interface
 (hostnames
  (opensmtpd-table-configuration
   (name "My-table")
   (data '("joshua" "$some$Long$EncrytpedPassword")))))
== fieldname: 'hostname' is of type boolean, or an == record whose fieldname 'values' are an assoc-list
(eg: (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "table") (data '("joshua" . "$encrypted$password")))).
DONE change relevant portions in opensmtpd-interface->string

This bit of code works in the repl too!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

((@@ (opensmtpd-records) opensmtpd-interface->string)
 (opensmtpd-interface
  (hostnames
   (opensmtpd-table-configuration
    (name "credentials")
    (data '(("joshua" . "$someLongEncrytpedPassword")))))))

TODO opensmtpd-match [20/24]

* NO list approach Guix probably won't like the list approach.


  (openmstpd-match
   (for
    (list 'not "for domain regex"
          (opensmtpd-table-configuration
           (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))

  (openmstpd-match
   (for
    (list "! for domain"
          (opensmtpd-table-configuration
           (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))

* opensmtpd-options-configuration approach I like this one quite a bit.

This method is a little bit more verbose. Well I guess it's a lot more verbose. But it's easier for me to properly parse what the user wants.

I would sanitize the options in the opensmtpd-match-configuration-for, openmsmtpd-match-from, opensmtpd-match-configuration-auth, opensmtpd-match-configuration-helo, opensmtpd-match-configuration-mail-from, opensmtpd-match-configuration-rcpt-to fieldnames. ********* for


  (openmstpd-match
   (for
    (opensmtpd-options-configuration
     (not #t)
     (method "domain regex") ;; valid options for "for" are "domain" or "domain regex"
     (opensmtpd-table-configuration
      (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))

Do I want a regex fieldname? Probably not. It makes it more verbose...


  (openmstpd-match
   (for
    (opensmtpd-options-configuration
     (not #t)
     (regex #t)
     (method "domain") ;; valid options for "for" are "domain"
     (opensmtpd-table-configuration
      (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))

* from


  (openmstpd-match
   (from
    (opensmtpd-options-configuration
     (not #t)
     (method "rdns regex") ;;valid options for from are "auth" "auth regex", "mail-from" "mail-from regex",
                           ;; "rdns", "rdns regex", "src", "src regex"
     (opensmtpd-table-configuration
      (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))

Do I want a regex fieldname?


  (openmstpd-match
   (from
    (opensmtpd-options-configuration
     (not #t)
     (regex #t)
     (method "rdns") ;;valid options for from are "auth", "mail-from", "rdns", "src"
     (opensmtpd-table-configuration
      (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))

* auth


  (openmstpd-match
   (auth
    (opensmtpd-options-configuration
     (not #t)
     (method "auth regex")
     (opensmtpd-table-configuration
      (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))

Do I want a regex fieldname?


  (openmstpd-match
   (auth
    (opensmtpd-options-configuration
     (not #t)
     (regex #t)
     (method "auth") ;; valid options for auth are "auth" or this method can be left blank.
     (opensmtpd-table-configuration
      (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))

* mail-from


  (openmstpd-match
   (mail-from
    (opensmtpd-options-configuration
     (not #t)
     (method "mail from")
     (opensmtpd-table-configuration
      (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))))
I tweak opensmtpd-match record and add a opensmtpd-options

  (opensmtpd-match-configuration
   (name "action-name")
   (options
    (list
     (opensmtpd-options-configuration
      (method "for domain regex")))
    ))
PROJ many of these options are not completely sanitized.

For example: "for domain" requires a domain | BUT this record, which does not have a domain gives no errors:


(opensmtpd-match-configuration
 (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration
       (option "for domain")))
 (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
          (name "local") )))
DONE for domain
    And there are a ton of other examples of this. :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:17]
  • :END:

The datastructures work:


(opensmtpd-match-configuration
 (name "local")
 (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration
       (option "for domain")
       (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration
               (name "this")
               (data (list "helo" "hello"))))))
 (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration)))

#Results

$4 = #< name: "local" action: #< method: "mbox" alias: #f ttl: #f user: #f userbase: #f virtual: #f wrapper: #f> for: #< option: "for domain" not: #f regex: #f value: #< name: "this" file-db: #f values: ("helo" "hello") type: #:148:97 (x)>>> from: #f auth: #f helo: #f mail-from: #f rcpt-to: #f tag: #f tls: #f>
DONE for domain regexp
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:19]
  • :END:

the datastructure works


(opensmtpd-match-configuration
 (name "local")
 (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration
       (regex #t)
       (option "for domain")
       (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration
               (name "this")
               (data (list "helo" "hello"))))))
 (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration)))

#Results

$4 = #< name: "local" action: #< method: "mbox" alias: #f ttl: #f user: #f userbase: #f virtual: #f wrapper: #f> for: #< option: "for domain" not: #f regex: #f value: #< name: "this" file-db: #f values: ("helo" "hello") type: #:148:97 (x)>>> from: #f auth: #f helo: #f mail-from: #f rcpt-to: #f tag: #f tls: #f>
DONE make opensmtpd-match-configuration->string work print for rcpt the appropriate match lines if some values now accept

Seems to work:


(opensmtpd-match-configuration->string (opensmtpd-match-configuration
 (name "local")
 (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration
       (regex #t)
       (option "for domain")
       (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration
               (name "this")
               (data (list "helo" "hello"))))))
 (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration))))
$6 = "match for domain regex =<this>= action \"local\" \n"

also seems to work


(opensmtpd-match-configuration->string (opensmtpd-match-configuration
 (name "local")
 (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration
       (option "for domain")
       (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration
               (name "this")
               (data (list "helo" "hello"))))))
 (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration))))
$7 = "match for domain =<this>= action \"local\" \n"
DONE for rcpt
DONE for rcpt regexp
DONE from auth user |
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:19]
  • :END: :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:19]
  • :END: :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:19]
  • :END:

(opensmtpd-option-configuration
       (regex #t)
       (option "from auth")
       (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration
               (name "this")
               (data (list "helo" "hello")))))
$8 = #<<opensmtpd-option-configuration> option: "from auth" not: #f regex: #t value: #<<opensmtpd-table-configuration> name: "this" file-db: #f values: ("helo" "hello") type: #<procedure 2bfa848 at <unknown port>:224:14 (x)>>>

DONE from auth regex user |
DONE make sure opensmtpd-option-configuration->string works for from auth if they use
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:20]
  • :END:

(opensmtpd-option-configuration->string
 (opensmtpd-option-configuration
  (regex #t)
  (option "from auth")
  (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration
          (name "this")
          (data (list "helo" "hello"))))))
$10 = "from auth regex =<this>= "
DONE from mail-from sender |
DONE from mail-from regexp
DONE from rdns
DONE from rdns regex
DONE from src
DONE from src regex
TODO do some more sanitizing of these last couple of options
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:20]
  • :END: :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:20]
  • :END: :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:20]
  • :END: :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:20]
  • :END: :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:21]
  • :END: :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:21]
  • :END: There may be some way to specify invalid data. For example:

tls does not support regex, not, or value fields. The below code should be an error.


 (display (opensmtpd-match-configuration->string (opensmtpd-match-configuration
 (tls (opensmtpd-option-configuration
        (option "tls") ;; this should be auth!!! NOT "helo"
        (regex #t)
        (not #t)
        (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration  (name "mytable")
                                 (data (list "cat" "kitten"))))))
 (from (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "from rdns")
                                             (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "table")
                                                                     (data (list "cat" "hat"))))))
 (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
          (name "matches"))))))
match from rdns <table> ! tls regex <mytable> action "matches"
DONE auth
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:21]
  • :END:

Well I need to fix this bug. Basically, I can make an with a table of values for 'option' "auth". And I can print that table with (opensmtpd-option-configuration->string)...That works fine...

But if I put that same record into an <opensmtpd-match-configuration> ...for some reason that 'auth' table is not being printed.


(opensmtpd-option-configuration
                                 (option "auth")
                                 (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "mytable")
                                                         (data (list "cat" "hat")))))
$20 = #<<opensmtpd-option-configuration> option: "auth" not: #f regex: #f value: #<<opensmtpd-table-configuration> name: "mytable" file-db: #f values: ("cat" "hat") type: #<procedure 1ee6ce8 at <unknown port>:860:40 (x)>>>
scheme@(opensmtpd-records) [4]> (opensmtpd-option-configuration->string $20)
$21 = "auth =<mytable>= "
scheme@(opensmtpd-records) [4]> (opensmtpd-match (name "matches")
                                                 (auth (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                                                        (option "auth")
                                                        (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration  (name "mytable")
                                                                                 (data (list "cat" "kitten"))))))
                                             (from (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "from rdns")
                                                                                  (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "table")
                                                                                                          (data (list "cat" "hat"))))))
                                             (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration)))
$22 = #<<opensmtpd-match-configuration> name: "matches" action: #<<opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration> method: "mbox" alias: #f ttl: #f user: #f userbase: #f virtual: #f wrapper: #f> for: #f from: #<<opensmtpd-option-configuration> option: "from rdns" not: #f regex: #f value: #<<opensmtpd-table-configuration> name: "table" file-db: #f values: ("cat" "hat") type: #<procedure 30bac20 at <unknown port>:876:89 (x)>>> auth: #<<opensmtpd-option-configuration> option: "auth" not: #f regex: #f value: #<<opensmtpd-table-configuration> name: "mytable" file-db: #f values: ("cat" "kitten") type: #<procedure 30baa80 at <unknown port>:873:63 (x)>>> helo: #f mail-from: #f rcpt-to: #f tag: #f tls: #f>
scheme@(opensmtpd-records) [5]> (opensmtpd-match-configuration->string $22)
$23 = "match from rdns =<table>= auth action \"matches\" \n"  ;; THERE IS SUPPOSED TO BE a "auth <mytable>" here
scheme@(opensmtpd-records) [5]>
TODO [!] auth
TODO auth regex
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:21]
  • :END:

This does NOT show the regex for the auth option. or the table why?


(opensmtpd-match-configuration
 (auth (opensmtpd-option-configuration
        (option "auth") ;; this should be auth!!! NOT "helo"
        (regex #t)
        (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration  (name "mytable")
                                 (data (list "cat" "kitten"))))))
 (from (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "from rdns")
                                             (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "table")
                                                                     (data (list "cat" "hat"))))))
 (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
          (name "matches"))))
$9 = #<<opensmtpd-match-configuration> action: #<<opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration> name: "matches" method: "mbox" alias: #f ttl: #f user: #f userbase: #f virtual: #f wrapper: #f> for: #f from: #<<opensmtpd-option-configuration> option: "from rdns" not: #f regex: #f value: #<<opensmtpd-table-configuration> name: "table" file-db: #f values: ("cat" "hat") type: #<procedure 1fb5fc0 at <unknown port>:144:52 (x)>>> auth: #<<opensmtpd-option-configuration> option: "auth" not: #f regex: #t value: #<<opensmtpd-table-configuration> name: "mytable" file-db: #f values: ("cat" "kitten") type: #<procedure 1fb5c40 at <unknown port>:141:15 (x)>>> helo: #f mail-from: #f rcpt-to: #f tag: #f tls: #f>
scheme@(opensmtpd-records) [4]> (display (opensmtpd-match-configuration->string $9))
match from rdns <table> auth action "matches" ;; there should be a regex in there.
DONE helo
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:21]
  • :END:

(opensmtpd-match-configuration (helo (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "helo") ;; this should be auth!!! NOT "helo" (regex #t) (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "mytable") (data (list "cat" "kitten")))))) (from (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "from rdns") (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "table") (data (list "cat" "hat")))))) (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration (name "matches")))) $10 = #< action: #< name: "matches" method: "mbox" alias: #f ttl: #f user: #f userbase: #f virtual: #f wrapper: #f> for: #f from: #< option: "from rdns" not: #f regex: #f value: #< name: "table" file-db: #f values: ("cat" "hat") type: #:252:52 (x)>>> auth: #f helo: #< option: "helo" not: #f regex: #t value: #< name: "mytable" file-db: #f values: ("cat" "kitten") type: #:249:15 (x)>>> mail-from: #f rcpt-to: #f tag: #f tls: #f> scheme@(opensmtpd-records) [5]> (opensmtpd-match-configuration->string $10) $11 = "match from rdns

helo regex action \"matches\" \n


DONE mail-from
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:22]
  • :END:

(display (opensmtpd-match-configuration->string (opensmtpd-match-configuration (mail-from (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "mail-from") ;; this should be auth!!! NOT "helo" (regex #t) (not #t) (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "mytable") (data (list "cat" "kitten")))))) (from (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "from rdns") (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "table") (data (list "cat" "hat")))))) (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration (name "matches")))))) match from rdns

! mail-from regex action "matches


DONE mail-from regex
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:22]
  • :END:

(display (opensmtpd-match-configuration->string (opensmtpd-match-configuration (mail-from (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "mail-from") ;; this should be auth!!! NOT "helo" (regex #t) (not #t) (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "mytable") (data (list "cat" "kitten")))))) (from (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "from rdns") (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "table") (data (list "cat" "hat")))))) (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration (name "matches")))))) match from rdns

! mail-from regex action "matches


DONE rcpt-to
DONE rcpt-to regex
    :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:22]
  • :END: :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from "TODO" [2021-11-02 Tue 04:23]
  • :END:

TODO sanitize fieldname 'matches' so that no two unique actions have the same name

I definitely should sanitize 'matches' a bit more. For example, you could have two different actions, one for local delivery and one for remote, with the same name. I should make sure that all unique actions have unique names.

Here is an example of two actions that have the same name, but different ttl values:


(opensmtpd-configuration
 (matches
  (list (opensmtpd-match-configuration
         (action
          (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
           (name "my-local-delivery")
           (ttl "50m"))))               ; 50 minutes
        (opensmtpd-match-configuration
         (action
          (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
           (name "my-local-delivery")
           (ttl "50h"))))))) ; 50 hours

PROJ follow the style guide and style up my project [1/4]

https://mumble.net/~campbell/scheme/style.txt

:SchemeStyleGuide:


Riastradh's Lisp Style Rules                            -*- outline -*-

   Copyright (C) 2007--2011 Taylor R. Campbell

   CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

   This work is licensed under a Creative Commons
   Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License:
   <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/>.

This is a guide to Lisp style, written by Taylor R. Campbell, to
describe the standard rules of Lisp style as well as a set of more
stringent rules for his own style.  This guide should be useful for
Lisp in general, but there are [or will be in the final draft] parts
that are focussed on or specific to Scheme or Common Lisp.

This guide is written primarily as a collection of rules, with
rationale for each rule.  (If a rule is missing rationale, please
inform the author!)  Although a casual reader might go through and read
the rules without the rationale, perhaps reasoning that reading of the
rationale would require more time than is available, such a reader
would derive little value from this guide.  In order to apply the rules
meaningfully, their spirit must be understood; the letter of the rules
serves only to hint at the spirit.  The rationale is just as important
as the rules.

There are many references in this document to `Emacs', `GNU Emacs',
`Edwin', and so on.  In this document, `Emacs' means any of a class of
editors related in design to a common ancestor, the EMACS editor macros
written for TECO on ITS on the PDP-10 in the middle of the nineteen
seventies.  All such editors -- or `all Emacsen', since `Emacsen' is
the plural of `Emacs' -- have many traits in common, such as a very
consistent set of key bindings, extensibility in Lisp, and so on.  `GNU
Emacs' means the member of the class of editors collectively known as
Emacsen that was written for the GNU Project in the middle of the
nineteen eighties, and which is today probably the most popular Emacs.
`Edwin' is MIT Scheme's Emacs, which is bundled as part of MIT Scheme,
and not available separately.  There are other Emacsen as well, such as
Hemlock and Climacs, but as the author of this document has little
experience with Emacsen other than GNU Emacs and Edwin, there is little
mention of other Emacsen.

This guide is a work in progress.  To be written:

- Indentation rules for various special operators.
- Philosophical rambling concerning naming.
- Rules for breaking lines.
- Many more examples.
- A more cohesive explanation of the author's principles for composing
  programs, and their implications.
- Rules for writing portable code.
- Some thoughts concerning extensions to the lexical syntax.
- Rules for writing or avoiding macros.
- Some unfinished rationale.
- More on documentation.
- The `Dependencies' subsection of the `General Layout' section should
  be put in a different section, the rest of which has yet to be
  written, on organization of programs, module systems, and portable
  code.

Feedback is welcome; address any feedback by email to the host
mumble.net's user `campbell', or by IRC to Riastradh in the #scheme
channel on Freenode (irc.freenode.net).  Feedback includes reports of
typos, questions, requests for clarification, and responses to the
rationale, except in the case of round brackets versus square
brackets, the argument surrounding which is supremely uninteresting
and now not merely a dead horse but a rotting carcass buzzing with
flies and being picked apart by vultures.

As this document has grown, the line between standard Lisp rules and
the author's own style has been blurred.  The author is considering
merging of the partition, but has not yet decided on this with
certainty.  Opinions on the subject are welcome -- is the partition
still useful to keep the author's biases and idiosyncrasies out of the
standard rules, or has the partition with its arbitrary nature only
caused disorganization of the whole document?

Unfortunately, this document is entirely unscientific.  It is at best a
superstition or philosophy, but one that the author of this document
has found to have improved his programs.  Furthermore, the author is
somewhat skeptical of claims of scientific analyses of these matters:
analyzing human behaviour, especially confined to the set of excellent
programmers who often have strong opinions about their methods for
building programs, is a very tricky task.

,* Standard Rules

These are the standard rules for formatting Lisp code; they are
repeated here for completeness, although they are surely described
elsewhere.  These are the rules implemented in Emacs Lisp modes, and
auxiliary utilities such as Paredit.

The rationale given here is merely the author's own speculation of the
origin of these rules, and should be taken as nothing more than it.
The reader shall, irrespective of the author's rationale, accept the
rules as sent by the reader's favourite deity, or Cthulhu if no such
deity strikes adequate fear into the heart of the reader.

,** Parentheses

,*** Terminology

This guide avoids the term /parenthesis/ except in the general use of
/parentheses/ or /parenthesized/, because the word's generally accepted
definition, outside of the programming language, is a statement whose
meaning is peripheral to the sentence in which it occurs, and *not* the
typographical symbols used to delimit such statements.

The balanced pair of typographical symbols that mark parentheses in
English text are /round brackets/, i.e. ( and ).  There are several
other balanced pairs of typographical symbols, such as /square
brackets/ (commonly called simply `brackets' in programming circles),
i.e. [ and ]; /curly braces/ (sometimes called simply `braces'), i.e. {
and }; /angle brackets/ (sometimes `brokets' (for `broken brackets')),
i.e. < and >.

In any balanced pair of typographical symbols, the symbol that begins
the region delimited by the symbols is called the /opening bracket/ or
the /left bracket/, such as ( or [ or { or <.  The symbol that ends
that region is called the /right bracket/ or the /closing bracket/,
such as > or } or ] or ).

,*** Spacing

If any text precedes an opening bracket or follows a closing bracket,
separate that text from that bracket with a space.  Conversely, leave
no space after an opening bracket and before following text, or after
preceding text and before a closing bracket.

  Unacceptable:

    (foo(bar baz)quux)
    (foo ( bar baz ) quux)

  Acceptable:

    (foo (bar baz) quux)

  Rationale:  This is the same spacing found in standard typography of
  European text.  It is more aesthetically pleasing.

,*** Line Separation

Absolutely do *not* place closing brackets on their own lines.

  Unacceptable:

    (define (factorial x)
      (if (< x 2)
          1
          (* x (factorial (- x 1
                          )
               )
          )
      )
    )

  Acceptable:

    (define (factorial x)
      (if (< x 2)
          1
          (* x (factorial (- x 1)))))

  Rationale:  The parentheses grow lonely if their closing brackets are
  all kept separated and segregated.

,**** Exceptions to the Above Rule Concerning Line Separation

Do not heed this section unless you know what you are doing.  Its title
does *not* make the unacceptable example above acceptable.

When commenting out fragments of expressions with line comments, it may
be necessary to break a line before a sequence of closing brackets:

  (define (foo bar)
    (list (frob bar)
          (zork bar)
          ;; (zap bar)
          ))

This is acceptable, but there are other alternatives.  In Common Lisp,
one can use the read-time optional syntax, `#+' or `#-', with a
feature optional that is guaranteed to be false or true -- `#+(OR)'
or `#-(AND)' --; for example,

  (define (foo bar)
    (list (frob bar)
          (zork bar)
          ,#+(or) (zap bar))).

Read-time optionals are expression-oriented, not line-oriented, so
the closing brackets need not be placed on the following line.  Some
Scheme implementations, and SRFI 62, also support expression comments
with `#;', which are operationally equivalent to the above read-time
optionals for Common Lisp:

  (define (foo bar)
    (list (frob bar)
          (zork bar)
          #;
           (zap bar)))

The expression is placed on another line in order to avoid confusing
editors that do not recognize S-expression comments; see the section
titled `Comments' below for more details.  However, the `#;' notation
is not standard -- it appears in neither the IEEE 1178 document nor in
the R5RS --, so line comments are preferable for portable Scheme code,
even if they require breaking a line before a sequence of closing
brackets.

Finally, it is acceptable to break a line immediately after an opening
bracket and immediately before a closing bracket for very long lists,
especially in files under version control.  This eases the maintenance
of the lists and clarifies version diffs.  Example:

  (define colour-names         ;Add more colour names to this list!
    '(
      blue
      cerulean
      green
      magenta
      purple
      red
      scarlet
      turquoise
      ))

,*** Parenthetical Philosophy

The actual bracket characters are simply lexical tokens to which little
significance should be assigned.  Lisp programmers do not examine the
brackets individually, or, Azathoth forbid, count brackets; instead
they view the higher-level structures expressed in the program,
especially as presented by the indentation.  Lisp is not about writing
a sequence of serial instructions; it is about building complex
structures by summing parts.  The composition of complex structures
from parts is the focus of Lisp programs, and it should be readily
apparent from the Lisp code.  Placing brackets haphazardly about the
presentation is jarring to a Lisp programmer, who otherwise would not
even have seen them for the most part.

,** Indentation and Alignment

The operator of any form, i.e. the first subform following the opening
round bracket, determines the rules for indenting or aligning the
remaining forms.  Many names in this position indicate special
alignment or indentation rules; these are special operators, macros, or
procedures that have certain parameter structures.

If the first subform is a non-special name, however, then if the second
subform is on the same line, align the starting column of all following
subforms with that of the second subform.  If the second subform is on
the following line, align its starting column with that of the first
subform, and do the same for all remaining subforms.

In general, Emacs will indent Lisp code correctly.  Run `C-M-q'
(indent-sexp) on any code to ensure that it is indented correctly, and
configure Emacs so that any non-standard forms are indented
appropriately.

  Unacceptable:

    (+ (sqrt -1)
      (* x y)
      (+ p q))

    (+
       (sqrt -1)
       (* x y)
       (+ p q))

  Acceptable:

    (+ (sqrt -1)
       (* x y)
       (+ p q))

    (+
     (sqrt -1)
     (* x y)
     (+ p q))

  Rationale:  The columnar alignment allows the reader to follow the
  operands of any operation straightforwardly, simply by scanning
  downward or upward to match a common column.  Indentation dictates
  structure; confusing indentation is a burden on the reader who wishes
  to derive structure without matching parentheses manually.

,*** Non-Symbol Indentation and Alignment

The above rules are not exhaustive; some cases may arise with strange
data in operator positions.

,**** Lists

Unfortunately, style varies here from person to person and from editor
to editor.  Here are some examples of possible ways to indent lists
whose operators are lists:

  Questionable:

    ((car x)                            ;Requires hand indentation.
       (cdr x)
       foo)

    ((car x) (cdr x)                    ;GNU Emacs
     foo)

  Preferable:

    ((car x)                            ;Any Emacs
     (cdr x)
     foo)

    ((car x) (cdr x)                    ;Edwin
             foo)

  Rationale:  The operands should be aligned, as if it were any other
  procedure call with a name in the operator position; anything other
  than this is confusing because it gives some operands greater visual
  distinction, allowing others to hide from the viewer's sight.  For
  example, the questionable indentation

    ((car x) (cdr x)
     foo)

  can make it hard to see that FOO and (CDR X) are both operands here
  at the same level.  However, GNU Emacs will generate that indentation
  by default.  (Edwin will not.)

,**** Strings

If the form in question is meant to be simply a list of literal data,
all of the subforms should be aligned to the same column, irrespective
of the first subform.

  Unacceptable:

    ("foo" "bar" "baz" "quux" "zot"
           "mumble" "frotz" "gargle" "mumph")

  Questionable, but acceptable:

    (3 1 4 1 5 9 2 6 5 3 5 8 9 7 9 3 2 3 8 4 6 2 6 4
       3 3 8 3 2 7 9 5 0 2 8 8 4 1 9 7 1 6 9 3 9 9 3)

  Acceptable:

    ("foo" "bar" "baz" "quux" "zot"
     "mumble" "frotz" "gargle" "mumph")

    ("foo"
     "bar" "baz" "quux" "zot"
     "mumble" "frotz" "gargle" "mumph")

  Rationale:  Seldom is the first subform distinguished for any reason,
  if it is a literal; usually in this case it indicates pure data, not
  code.  Some editors and pretty-printers, however, will indent
  unacceptably in the example given unless the second subform is on the
  next line anyway, which is why the last way to write the fragment is
  usually best.

,** Names

Naming is subtle and elusive.  Bizarrely, it is simultaneously
insignificant, because an object is independent of and unaffected by
the many names by which we refer to it, and also of supreme
importance, because it is what programming -- and, indeed, almost
everything that we humans deal with -- is all about.  A full
discussion of the concept of name lies far outside the scope of this
document, and could surely fill not even a book but a library.

Symbolic names are written with English words separated by hyphens.
Scheme and Common Lisp both fold the case of names in programs;
consequently, camel case is frowned upon, and not merely because it is
ugly.  Underscores are unacceptable separators except for names that
were derived directly from a foreign language without translation.

  Unacceptable:

    XMLHttpRequest
    foreach
    append_map

  Acceptable:

    xml-http-request
    for-each
    append-map

,*** Funny Characters

There are several different conventions in different Lisps for the use
of non-alphanumeric characters in names.

,**** Scheme

,***** Question Marks: Predicates

Affix a question mark to the end of a name for a procedure whose
purpose is to ask a question of an object and to yield a boolean
answer.  Such procedures are called `predicates'.  Do not use a
question mark if the procedure may return any object other than a
boolean.

  Examples:  pair? procedure? proper-list?
  Non-examples:  member assoc any every

Pronounce the question mark as if it were the isolated letter `p'.  For
example, to read the fragment (PAIR? OBJECT) aloud, say: `pair-pee
object.'

,***** Exclamation Marks: Destructive Operations

Affix an exclamation mark to the end of a name for a procedure (or
macro) whose primary purpose is to modify an object.  Such procedures
are called `destructive'.

  Examples: set-car! append!

Avoid using the exclamation mark willy nilly for just *any* procedure
whose operation involves any kind of mutation or side effect; instead,
use the exclamation mark to identify procedures that exist *solely* for
the purpose of destructive update (e.g., SET-CAR!), or to distinguish a
destructive, or potentially destructive (in the case of linear-update
operations such as APPEND!), variant of a procedure of which there also
exists a purely functional variant (e.g., APPEND).

Pronounce the exclamation mark as `bang'.  For example, to read the
fragment (APPEND! LIST TAIL) aloud, say: `append-bang list tail.'

,***** Asterisks: Variants, Internal Routines, Mutable Globals

Affix an asterisk to the end of a name to make a variation on a theme
of the original name.

  Example: let -> let*

Prefer a meaningful name over an asterisk; the asterisk does not
explain what variation on the theme the name means.

Affix an asterisk to the beginning of a name to make an internal
routine for that name.  Again, prefer a meaningful name over an
asterisk.

Affix asterisks to the beginning and end of a globally mutable
variable.  This allows the reader of the program to recognize very
easily that it is badly written!

,***** `WITH-' and `CALL-WITH-': Dynamic State and Cleanup

Prefix `WITH-' to any procedure that establishes dynamic state and
calls a nullary procedure, which should be the last (required)
argument.  The dynamic state should be established for the extent of
the nullary procedure, and should be returned to its original state
after that procedure returns.

  Examples: with-input-from-file with-output-to-file

  Exception:  Some systems provide a procedure (WITH-CONTINUATION
  <continuation> <thunk>), which calls <thunk> in the given
  continuation, using that continuation's dynamic state.  If <thunk>
  returns, it will return to <continuation>, not to the continuation of
  the call to WITH-CONTINUATION.  This is acceptable.

Prefix `CALL-WITH-' to any procedure that calls a procedure, which
should be its last argument, with some arguments, and is either somehow
dependent upon the dynamic state or continuation of the program, or
will perform some action to clean up data after the procedure argument
returns.  Generally, `CALL-WITH-' procedures should return the values
that the procedure argument returns, after performing the cleaning
action.

  Examples:

  - CALL-WITH-INPUT-FILE and CALL-WITH-OUTPUT-FILE both accept a
    pathname and a procedure as an argument, open that pathname (for
    input or output, respectively), and call the procedure with one
    argument, a port corresponding with the file named by the given
    pathname.  After the procedure returns, CALL-WITH-INPUT-FILE and
    CALL-WITH-OUTPUT-FILE close the file that they opened, and return
    whatever the procedure returned.

  - CALL-WITH-CURRENT-CONTINUATION is dependent on the continuation
    with which it was called, and passes as an argument an escape
    procedure corresponding with that continuation.

  - CALL-WITH-OUTPUT-STRING, a common but non-standard procedure
    definable in terms of OPEN-OUTPUT-STRING and GET-OUTPUT-STRING from
    SRFI 6 (Basic String Ports), calls its procedure argument with an
    output port, and returns a string of all of the output written to
    that port.  Note that it does not return what the procedure
    argument returns, which is an exception to the above rule.

Generally, the distinction between these two classes of procedures is
that `CALL-WITH-...' procedures should not establish fresh dynamic
state and instead pass explicit arguments to their procedure arguments,
whereas `WITH-...' should do the opposite and establish dynamic state
while passing zero arguments to their procedure arguments.

,** Comments

Write heading comments with at least four semicolons; see also the
section below titled `Outline Headings'.

Write top-level comments with three semicolons.

Write comments on a particular fragment of code before that fragment
and aligned with it, using two semicolons.

Write margin comments with one semicolon.

The only comments in which omission of a space between the semicolon
and the text is acceptable are margin comments.

  Examples:

    ;;;; Frob Grovel

    ;;; This section of code has some important implications:
    ;;;   1. Foo.
    ;;;   2. Bar.
    ;;;   3. Baz.

    (define (fnord zarquon)
      ;; If zob, then veeblefitz.
      (quux zot
            mumble             ;Zibblefrotz.
            frotz))

,* Riastradh's Non-Standard Rules

Three principles guide this style, roughly ordered according to
descending importance:

1. The purpose of a program is to describe an idea, and not the way
   that the idea must be realized; the intent of the program's meaning,
   rather than peripheral details that are irrelevant to its intent,
   should be the focus of the program, *irrespective* of whether a
   human or a machine is reading it.  [It would be nice to express this
   principle more concisely.]

2. The sum of the parts is easier to understand than the whole.

3. Aesthetics matters.  No one enjoys reading an ugly program.

,** General Layout

This section contains rules that the author has found generally helpful
in keeping his programs clean and presentable, though they are not
especially philosophically interesting.

Contained in the rationale for some of the following rules are
references to historical limitations of terminals and printers, which
are now considered aging cruft of no further relevance to today's
computers.  Such references are made only to explain specific measures
chosen for some of the rules, such as a limit of eighty columns per
line, or sixty-six lines per page.  There is a real reason for each of
the rules, and this real reason is not intrinsically related to the
historical measures, which are mentioned only for the sake of
providing some arbitrary measure for the limit.

,*** File Length

If a file exceeds five hundred twelve lines, begin to consider
splitting it into multiple files.  Do not write program files that
exceed one thousand twenty-four lines.  Write a concise but
descriptive title at the top of each file, and include no content in
the file that is unrelated to its title.

  Rationale:  Files that are any larger should generally be factored
  into smaller parts.  (One thousand twenty-four is a nicer number than
  one thousand.)  Identifying the purpose of the file helps to break it
  into parts if necessary and to ensure that nothing unrelated is
  included accidentally.

,*** Top-Level Form Length

Do not write top-level forms that exceed twenty-one lines, except for
top-level forms that serve only the purpose of listing large sets of
data.  If a procedure exceeds this length, split it apart and give
names to its parts.  Avoid names formed simply by appending a number
to the original procedure's name; give meaningful names to the parts.

  Rationale:  Top-level forms, especially procedure definitions, that
  exceed this length usually combine too many concepts under one name.
  Readers of the code are likely to more easily understand the code if
  it is composed of separately named parts.  Simply appending a number
  to the original procedure's name can help only the letter of the
  rule, not the spirit, however, even if the procedure was taken from a
  standard algorithm description.  Using comments to mark the code with
  its corresponding place in the algorithm's description is acceptable,
  but the algorithm should be split up in meaningful fragments anyway.

  Rationale for the number twenty-one:  Twenty-one lines, at a maximum
  of eighty columns per line, fits in a GNU Emacs instance running in a
  24x80 terminal.  Although the terminal may have twenty-four lines,
  three of the lines are occupied by GNU Emacs: one for the menu bar
  (which the author of this guide never uses, but which occupies a line
  nevertheless in a vanilla GNU Emacs installation), one for the mode
  line, and one for the minibuffer's window.  The writer of some code
  may not be limited to such a terminal, but the author of this style
  guide often finds it helpful to have at least four such terminals or
  Emacs windows open simultaneously, spread across a twelve-inch laptop
  screen, to view multiple code fragments.

,*** Line Length

Do not write lines that exceed eighty columns, or if possible
seventy-two.

  Rationale:  Following multiple lines that span more columns is
  difficult for humans, who must remember the line of focus and scan
  right to left from the end of the previous line to the beginning of
  the next line; the more columns there are, the harder this is to do.
  Sticking to a fixed limit helps to improve readability.

  Rationale for the numbers eighty and seventy-two:  It is true that we
  have very wide screens these days, and we are no longer limited to
  eighty-column terminals; however, we ought to exploit our wide
  screens not by writing long lines, but by viewing multiple fragments
  of code in parallel, something that the author of this guide does
  very often.  Seventy-two columns leave room for several nested layers
  of quotation in email messages before the code reaches eighty
  columns.  Also, a fixed column limit yields nicer printed output,
  especially in conjunction with pagination; see the section
  `Pagination' below.

,*** Blank Lines

Separate each adjacent top-level form with a single blank line (i.e.
two line breaks).  If two blank lines seem more appropriate, break the
page instead.  Do not place blank lines in the middle of a procedure
body, except to separate internal definitions; if there is a blank
line for any other reason, split the top-level form up into multiple
ones.

  Rationale:  More than one blank line is distracting and sloppy.  If
  the two concepts that are separated by multiple blank lines are
  really so distinct that such a wide separator is warranted, then
  they are probably better placed on separate pages anyway; see the
  next section, `Pagination'.

,*** Pagination

Separate each file into pages of no more than sixty-six lines and no
fewer than forty lines with form feeds (ASCII #x0C, or ^L, written in
Emacs with `C-q C-l'), on either side of which is a single line break
(but not a blank line).

  Rationale:  Keeping distinct concepts laid out on separate pages
  helps to keep them straight.  This is helpful not only for the
  writer of the code, but also for the reader.  It also allows readers
  of the code to print it onto paper without fiddling with printer
  settings to permit pages of more than sixty-six lines (which is the
  default number for many printers), and pagination also makes the
  code easier to navigate in Emacs, with the `C-x [' and `C-x ]' keys
  (`backward-page' and `forward-page', respectively).  To avoid
  excessively small increments of page-by-page navigation, and to
  avoid wasting paper, each page should generally exceed forty lines.

  `C-x l' in Emacs will report the number of lines in the page on which
  the point lies; this is useful for finding where pagination is
  necessary.

,*** Outline Headings

Use Emacs's Outline Mode to give titles to the pages, and if
appropriate a hierarchical structure.  Set `outline-regexp' (or
`outline-pattern' in Edwin) to "\f\n;;;;+ ", so that each form feed
followed by an line break followed by at least four semicolons and a
space indicates an outline heading to Emacs.  Use four semicolons for
the highest level of headings in the hierarchy, and one more for each
successively nested level of hierarchy.

  Rationale:  Not only does this clarify the organization of the code,
  but readers of the code can then navigate the code's structure with
  Outline Mode commands such as `C-c C-f', `C-c C-b', `C-c C-u', and
  `C-c C-d' (forward, backward, up, down, respectively, headings).

,*** Dependencies

When writing a file or module, minimize its dependencies.  If there are
too many dependencies, consider breaking the module up into several
parts, and writing another module that is the sum of the parts and that
depends only on the parts, not their dependencies.

  Rationale:  A fragment of a program with fewer dependencies is less
  of a burden on the reader's cognition.  The reader can more easily
  understand the fragment in isolation; humans are very good at local
  analyses, and terrible at global ones.

,** Naming

This section requires an elaborate philosophical discussion which the
author is too ill to have the energy to write at this moment.

Compose concise but meaningful names.  Do not cheat by abbreviating
words or using contractions.

  Rationale:  Abbreviating words in names does not make them shorter;
  it only makes them occupy less screen space.  The reader still must
  understand the whole long name.  This does not mean, however, that
  names should necessarily be long; they should be descriptive.  Some
  long names are more descriptive than some short names, but there are
  also descriptive names that are not long and long names that are not
  descriptive.  Here is an example of a long name that is not
  descriptive, from SchMUSE, a multi-user simulation environment
  written in MIT Scheme:

    frisk-descriptor-recursive-subexpr-descender-for-frisk-descr-env

  Not only is it long (sixty-four characters) and completely
  impenetrable, but halfway through its author decided to abbreviate
  some words as well!

Do not write single-letter variable names.  Give local variables
meaningful names composed from complete English words.

  Rationale:  It is tempting to reason that local variables are
  invisible to other code, so it is OK to be messy with their names.
  This is faulty reasoning: although the next person to come along and
  use a library may not care about anything but the top-level
  definitions that it exports, this is not the only audience of the
  code.  Someone will also want to read the code later on, and if it is
  full of impenetrably terse variable names without meaning, that
  someone will have a hard time reading the code.

Give names to intermediate values where their expressions do not
adequately describe them.

  Rationale:  An `expression' is a term that expresses some value.
  Although a machine needs no higher meaning for this value, and
  although it should be written to be sufficiently clear for a human to
  understand what it means, the expression might mean something more
  than just what it says where it is used.  Consequently, it is helpful
  for humans to see names given to expressions.

  Example:  A hash table HASH-TABLE maps foos to bars; (HASH-TABLE/GET
  HASH-TABLE FOO #F) expresses the datum that HASH-TABLE maps FOO to,
  but that expression gives the reader no hint of any information
  concerning that datum.  (LET ((BAR (HASH-TABLE/GET HASH-TABLE FOO
  #F))) ...)  gives a helpful name for the reader to understand the
  code without having to find the definition of HASH-TABLE.

  Index variables such as i and j, or variables such as A and D naming
  the car and cdr of a pair, are acceptable only if they are completely
  unambiguous in the scope.  For example,

    (do ((i 0 (+ i 1)))
        ((= i (vector-length vector)))
      (frobnicate (vector-ref vector i)))

  is acceptable because the scope of i is very clearly limited to a
  single vector.  However, if more vectors are involved, using more
  index variables such as j and k will obscure the program further.

Avoid functional combinators, or, worse, the point-free (or
`point-less') style of code that is popular in the Haskell world.  At
most, use function composition only where the composition of functions
is the crux of the idea being expressed, rather than simply a procedure
that happens to be a composition of two others.

  Rationale:  Tempting as it may be to recognize patterns that can be
  structured as combinations of functional combinators -- say, `compose
  this procedure with the projection of the second argument of that
  other one', or (COMPOSE FOO (PROJECT 2 BAR)) --, the reader of the
  code must subsequently examine the elaborate structure that has been
  built up to obscure the underlying purpose.  The previous fragment
  could have been written (LAMBDA (A B) (FOO (BAR B))), which is in
  fact shorter, and which tells the reader directly what argument is
  being passed on to what, and what argument is being ignored, without
  forcing the reader to search for the definitions of FOO and BAR or
  the call site of the final composition.  The explicit fragment
  contains substantially more information when intermediate values are
  named, which is very helpful for understanding it and especially for
  modifying it later on.

  The screen space that can be potentially saved by using functional
  combinators is made up for by the cognitive effort on the part of the
  reader.  The reader should not be asked to search globally for usage
  sites in order to understand a local fragment.  Only if the structure
  of the composition really is central to the point of the narrative
  should it be written as such.  For example, in a symbolic integrator
  or differentiator, composition is an important concept, but in most
  code the structure of the composition is completely irrelevant to the
  real point of the code.

If a parameter is ignored, give it a meaningful name nevertheless and
say that it is ignored; do not simply call it `ignored'.

In Common Lisp, variables can be ignored with (DECLARE (IGNORE ...)).
Some Scheme systems have similar declarations, but the portable way to
ignore variables is just to write them in a command context, where
their values will be discarded, preferably with a comment indicating
this purpose:

  (define (foo x y z)
    x z                         ;ignore
    (frobnitz y))

  Rationale:  As with using functional combinators to hide names,
  avoiding meaningful names for ignored parameters only obscures the
  purpose of the program.  It is helpful for a reader to understand
  what parameters a procedure is independent of, or if someone wishes
  to change the procedure later on, it is helpful to know what other
  parameters are available.  If the ignored parameters were named
  meaninglessly, then these people would be forced to search for call
  sites of the procedure in order to get a rough idea of what
  parameters might be passed here.

When naming top-level bindings, assume namespace partitions unless in a
context where they are certain to be absent.  Do not write explicit
namespace prefixes, such as FOO:BAR for an operation BAR in a module
FOO, unless the names will be used in a context known not to have any
kind of namespace partitions.

  Rationale:  Explicit namespace prefixes are ugly, and lengthen names
  without adding much semantic content.  Common Lisp has its package
  system to separate the namespaces of symbols; most Schemes have
  mechanisms to do so as well, even if the RnRS do not specify any.  It
  is better to write clear names which can be disambiguated if
  necessary, rather than to write names that assume some kind of
  disambiguation to be necessary to begin with.  Furthermore, explicit
  namespace prefixes are inadequate to cover name clashes anyway:
  someone else might choose the same namespace prefix.  Relegating this
  issue to a module system removes it from the content of the program,
  where it is uninteresting.

,** Comments

Write comments only where the code is incapable of explaining itself.
Prefer self-explanatory code over explanatory comments.  Avoid
`literate programming' like the plague.

  Rationale:  If the code is often incapable of explaining itself, then
  perhaps it should be written in a more expressive language.  This may
  mean using a different programming language altogether, or, since we
  are talking about Lisp, it may mean simply building a combinator
  language or a macro language for the purpose.  `Literate programming'
  is the logical conclusion of languages incapable of explaining
  themselves; it is a direct concession of the inexpressiveness of the
  computer language implementing the program, to the extent that the
  only way a human can understand the program is by having it rewritten
  in a human language.

Do not write interface documentation in the comments for the
implementation of the interface.  Explain the interface at the top of
the file if it is a single-file library, or put that documentation in
another file altogether.  (See the `Documentation' section below if the
interface documentation comments grow too large for a file.)

  Rationale:  A reader who is interested only in the interface really
  should not need to read through the implementation to pick out its
  interface; by putting the interface documentation at the top, not
  only is such a reader's task of identifying the interface made
  easier, but the implementation code can be more liberally commented
  without fear of distracting this reader.  To a reader who is
  interested in the implementation as well, the interface is still
  useful in order to understand what concepts the implementation is
  implementing.

  Example: <http://mumble.net/~campbell/scheme/skip-list.scm>

  In this example of a single-file library implementing the skip list
  data structure, the first page explains the purpose and dependencies
  of the file (which are useful for anyone who intends to use it, even
  though dependencies are really implementation details), and the next
  few pages explain the usage of skip lists as implemented in that
  file.  On the first page of implementation, `Skip List Structure',
  there are some comments of interest only to a reader who wishes to
  understand the implementation; the same goes for the rest of the
  file, none of which must a reader read whose interest is only in the
  usage of the library.

Avoid block comments (i.e. #| ... |#).  Use S-expression comments (`#;'
in Scheme, with the expression to comment on the next line; `#+(OR)' or
`#-(AND)' in Common Lisp) to comment out whole expressions.  Use blocks
of line comments for text.

  Rationale:  Editor support for block comments is weak, because it
  requires keeping a detailed intermediate parse state of the whole
  buffer, which most Emacsen do not do.  At the very least, #|| ... ||#
  is better, because most Emacsen will see vertical bars as symbol
  delimiters, and lose trying to read a very, very long symbol, if they
  try to parse #| ... |#, whereas they will just see two empty symbols
  and otherwise innocuous text between them if they try to parse #||
  ... ||#.  In any case, in Emacs, `M-x comment-region RET', or `M-;'
  (comment-dwim), is trivial to type.

  The only standard comments in Scheme are line comments.  There are
  SRFIs for block comments and S-expression comments, but support for
  them varies from system to system.  Expression comments are not hard
  for editors to deal with because it is safe not to deal with them at
  all; however, in Scheme S-expression comments, which are written by
  prefixing an expression with `#;', the expression to be commented
  should be placed on the next line.  This is because editors that do
  not deal with them at all may see the semicolon as the start of a
  line comment, which will throw them off.  Expression comments in
  Common Lisp, however, are always safe.

  In Common Lisp, the two read-time optionals that are guaranteed to
  ignore any form following them are `#+(OR)' and `#-(AND)'.  `#+NIL'
  is sometimes used in their stead, but, while it may appear to be an
  obviously false optional, it actually is not.  The feature
  expressions are read in the KEYWORD package, so NIL is read not as
  CL:NIL, i.e. the boolean false value, but as :NIL, a keyword symbol
  whose name happens to be `NIL'.  Not only is it not read as the
  boolean false value, but it has historically been used to indicate a
  feature that might be enabled -- in JonL White's New Implementation
  of Lisp!  However, the New Implementation of Lisp is rather old these
  days, and unlikely to matter much...until Alastair Bridgewater writes
  Nyef's Implementation of Lisp.

,** Documentation

On-line references and documentation/manuals are both useful for
independent purposes, but there is a very fine distinction between
them.  Do not generate documentation or manuals automatically from the
text of on-line references.

  Rationale: /On-line references/ are quick blurbs associated with
  objects in a running Lisp image, such as documentation strings in
  Common Lisp or Emacs Lisp.  These assume that the reader is familiar
  with the gist of the surrounding context, but unclear on details;
  on-line references specify the details of individual objects.

  /Documentation/ and /manuals/ are fuller, organized, and cohesive
  documents that explain the surrounding context to readers who are
  unfamiliar with it.  A reader should be able to pick a manual up and
  begin reading it at some definite point, perusing it linearly to
  acquire an understanding of the subject.  Although manuals may be
  dominated by reference sections, they should still have sections that
  are linearly readable to acquaint the reader with context.

,** Round and Square Brackets

Some implementations of Scheme provide a non-standard extension of the
lexical syntax whereby balanced pairs of square brackets are
semantically indistinguishable from balanced pairs of round brackets.
Do not use this extension.

  Rationale:  Because this is a non-standard extension, it creates
  inherently non-portable code, of a nature much worse than using a
  name in the program which is not defined by the R5RS.  The reason
  that we have distinct typographical symbols in the first place is to
  express different meaning.  The only distinction between round
  brackets and square brackets is in convention, but the precise nature
  of the convention is not specified by proponents of square brackets,
  who suggest that they be used for `clauses', or for forms that are
  parts of enclosing forms.  This would lead to such constructions as

    (let [(x 5) (y 3)] ...)

  or

    (let ([x 5] [y 3]) ...)

  or

    (let [[x 5] [y 3]] ...),

  the first two of which the author of this guide has seen both of, and
  the last of which does nothing to help to distinguish the parentheses
  anyway.

  The reader of the code should not be forced to stumble over a
  semantic identity because it is expressed by a syntactic distinction.
  The reader's focus should not be directed toward the lexical tokens;
  it should be directed toward the structure, but using square brackets
  draws the reader's attention unnecessarily to the lexical tokens.

,* Attribution

:END:

DONE I have to get change (let ([x 5] [y 3])) -> (let ((x 5) (y 3)))

TODO comments


  ;;;; Frob Grovel

    ;;; This section of code has some important implications:
    ;;;   1. Foo.
    ;;;   2. Bar.
    ;;;   3. Baz.

    (define (fnord zarquon)
      ;; If zob, then veeblefitz.
      (quux zot
            mumble             ;Zibblefrotz.
            frotz))

TODO literal data

Strings

If the form in question is meant to be simply a list of literal data, all of the subforms should be aligned to the same column, irrespective of the first subform.

Unacceptable:

("foo" "bar" "baz" "quux" "zot" "mumble" "frotz" "gargle" "mumph")

Questionable, but acceptable:

(3 1 4 1 5 9 2 6 5 3 5 8 9 7 9 3 2 3 8 4 6 2 6 4 3 3 8 3 2 7 9 5 0 2 8 8 4 1 9 7 1 6 9 3 9 9 3)

Acceptable:

("foo" "bar" "baz" "quux" "zot" "mumble" "frotz" "gargle" "mumph")

TODO follow this syntax convention proc args

("foo" "bar" "baz" "quux" "zot" "mumble" "frotz" "gargle" "mumph")

:alignment: The operator of any form, i.e. the first subform following the opening round bracket, determines the rules for indenting or aligning the remaining forms. Many names in this position indicate special alignment or indentation rules; these are special operators, macros, or procedures that have certain parameter structures.

If the first subform is a non-special name, however, then if the second subform is on the same line, align the starting column of all following subforms with that of the second subform. If the second subform is on the following line, align its starting column with that of the first subform, and do the same for all remaining subforms.

In general, Emacs will indent Lisp code correctly. Run `C-M-q' (indent-sexp) on any code to ensure that it is indented correctly, and configure Emacs so that any non-standard forms are indented appropriately.

Unacceptable:

(+ (sqrt -1) (* x y) (+ p q))

( (sqrt -1) (* x y) ( p q))

Acceptable:

(+ (sqrt -1) (* x y) (+ p q))

( (sqrt -1) (* x y) ( p q))

Rationale: The columnar alignment allows the reader to follow the operands of any operation straightforwardly, simply by scanning downward or upward to match a common column. Indentation dictates structure; confusing indentation is a burden on the reader who wishes to derive structure without matching parentheses manually.

:END:

If you have a procedure, then it's arguments should be on the same line.


(proc args
      (proc (proc
             args)
            (proc args)
            (proc (proc
                   args)
                  (proc (proc
                         (proc (proc
                                args))))))
      + (proc (proc
               args)))

TODO write various tests for <opensmtpd-configuration>

TODO revert commit fdfd589c9eb06e09694623df20cc2ddd367f4ae1

I have many bits of code in opensmtpd.org.archive that should result in an error. I should write some tests for this.

aka put that commit at the top of the commit history.


git log fdfd589c9eb06e09694623df20cc2ddd367f4ae1

TODO which sanitize function is better? Pick the better sanitize method and use that one.

The sanitize function found in opensmtpd-interface-filters

Or the sanitize function sanitize-list-of-options-for-match-configuration ?

sanitize-list-of-options-for-match-configuration is probably faster. But is it? It is an iteratize loop that checks for all issues as it loops through the options. There is a lot of repetitive code in this procedure.

TODO remove opensmtpd-table-type fieldname and instead move that it its own procedure outside of the record

BUT opensmtpd-interface-filters certainly seems easier to follow.

ONly use one function instead of

;; this procedure takes in one argument. ;; if that argument is an whose fieldname 'values' is an assoc-list, then it returns ;; #t, #f if otherwise. ;; TODO should I remove these two functions? And instead use the (opensmtpd-table-configuration-type) procedure? (define (table-whose-data-are-assoc-list? table) (if (not (opensmtpd-table-configuration? table)) #f (assoc-list? (opensmtpd-table-configuration-data table))))

;; this procedure takes in one argument ;; if that argument is an whose fieldname 'values' is a list of strings, then it returns ;; #t, #f if otherwise. (define (table-whose-data-are-a-list-of-strings? table) (if (not (opensmtpd-table-configuration? table)) #f (list-of-strings? (opensmtpd-table-configuration-data table))))

And opensmtpd-table-type

PROJ things to change based on review [3/5]

DONE Write a proper changelog.

DONE define "string-in-list?" with member?

DONE replace [] with ()

TODO Shorten the sanitize procedure for opensmtpd-option-configuration

Are there other procedures that could use this?

TODO Review your class names.

It does all that in needs to do. How can I shorten it? I also don't think it makes too much sense to add -configuration for anything but the top-level configuration record, it just requires you to type much more configuration than you probably want.

DONE eg: rename opensmtpd-interface and

opensmtpd-socket to opensmtpd-interface and opensmtpd-socket.

So you can either have an opensmtp-interface (with family and a bunch of options) or an opensmtp-socket (with a bunch of options). Sounds like a much nicer ontology, doesn't it?

Take a look at the nginx code. All of its records end in "-configuration".

TODO should I rename opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration

Do I really want to do this? and opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration ?

TODO OpenSMTPD Service documentation

OpenSMTPD is an easy-to-use mail transfer agent (MTA). Its configuration file is throughly documented in man 5 smtpd.conf. OpenSMTPD listens for incoming mail and matches the mail to actions. The following records represent those stages:

listens <opensmtpd-interface
<opensmtpd-socket>
matches <opensmtpd-match-configuration>
actions <opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration>
<opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration>

Additionally, each <opensmtpd-interface> and ~~ may use a list of ~~, and/or ~~ records to filter email/spam. Also numerous records' fieldnames use <opensmtpd-table-configuration> to hold lists or key value pairs of data.

A simple example configuration is below:


(let ((smtp.gnu.org (opensmtpd-pki-configuration
                        (domain "smtp.gnu.org")
                        (cert "file.cert")
                        (key "file.key"))))
  (service opensmtpd-service-type
           (opensmtpd-configuration
            (listen-ons (list
                         (opensmtpd-interface
                          (pki smtp.gnu.org))
                         (opensmtpd-interface
                          (pki smtp.gnu.org)
                          (secure-connection "smtps"))))
            (matches (list
                      (opensmtpd-match-configuration
                       (action
                        (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
                         (name "local-delivery"))))
                      (opensmtpd-match-configuration
                       (action
                        (opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration
                         (name "relay")))))))))
  • Scheme Variable: opensmtpd-service-type

Service type for the OpenSMTPD (https://www.opensmtpd.org) email server. The value for this service type is a <opensmtpd-configuration> record.

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-configuration

Data type representing the configuration of OpenSMTPD.

  • package (default: opensmtpd)

The OpenSMTPD package to use.

  • config-file (default: #f)

File-like object of the OpenSMTPD configuration file to use. By default it listens on the loopback network interface, and allows for mail from users and daemons on the local machine, as well as permitting email to remote servers. Run man smtpd.conf for more information.

  • bounce (default: (list "4h"))

bounce is a list of strings (max length 4), which send warning messages to the envelope sender when temporary delivery failures cause a message to remain in the queue for longer than string delay. Each string _delay_ parameter consists of a string beginning with a positive decimal integer and a unit 's', 'm', 'h', or 'd'. At most four delay parameters can be specified.

  • listen-ons (default: (list (opensmtpd-interface)))

listen-ons is a list of <opensmtpd-interface> records. This list details what interfaces and ports OpenSMTPD listens on as well as other information.

  • listen-on-socket (default: (opensmtpd-socket-configuration))

Listens for incoming connections on the Unix domain socket.

  • includes (default: #f)

# TODO includes should support a list of string filenames or gexps. includes is a list of string filenames. Each filename's contents is additional configuration that is inserted into the top of the configuration file.

  • matches default:

#+BEGIN_SRC scheme (list (opensmtpd-match-configuration (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration (name "local") (method "mbox"))) (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "for local")))) (opensmtpd-match-configuration (action (opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration (name "outbound"))) (from (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "from local"))) (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "for any"))))) #+END_SRC

matches is a list of <opensmtpd-match-configuration> records, which matches incoming mail and sends it to a correspending action. The match records are evaluated sequentially, with the first match winning. If an incoming mail does not match any match records, then it is rejected.

# TODO when the code supports mda-wrappers, add in this documentation. # - mda-wrappers

  • mta-max-deferred (default: 100)

When delivery to a given host is suspended due to temporary failures, cache at most number envelopes for that host such that they can be delivered as soon as another delivery succeeds to that host. The default is 100.

  • queue (default: #f)

queue expects an <opensmtpd-queue-configuration> record. With it, one may compress and encrypt queue-ed emails as well as set the default expiration time for temporarily undeliverable messages.

  • smtp (default: #f)

smtp expects an <opensmtpd-smtp-configuration> record, which lets one specifiy how large email may be along with other settings.

  • srs (default: #f)

srs expects an <opensmtpd-srs-configuration> record, which lets one set up SRS, the Sender Rewritting Scheme.

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-interface

Data type representing the configuration of an <opensmtpd-interface>. Listen on the fieldname interface for incoming connections, using the same syntax as for ifconfig(8). The interface parameter may also be an string interface group, an string IP address, or a string domain name. Listening can optionally be restricted to a specific address fieldname family, which can be either "inet4" or "inet6".

  • interface (default: "lo")

The string interface to listen for incoming connections. These interface can usually be found by the command ip link.

  • family (default: #f)

The string IP family to use. Valid strings are "inet4" or "inet6".

  • auth (default: #f)

Support SMTPAUTH: clients may only start SMTP transactions after successful authentication. If auth is #t, then users are authenticated against their own normal login credentials. Alternatively auth may be an <opensmtpd-table-configuration> whose users are authenticated against their passwords.

  • auth-optional (default: #f)

Support SMTPAUTH optionally: clients need not authenticate, but may do so. This allows the <opensmtpd-interface> to both accept incoming mail from untrusted senders and permit outgoing mail from authenticated users (using <opensmtpd-match-configuration> fieldname auth). It can be used in situations where it is not possible to listen on a separate port (usually the submission port, 587) for users to authenticate.

  • filters (default: #f)

A list of one or many <opensmtpd-filter-configuration> or <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration> records. The filters are applied sequentially. These records listen and filter on connections handled by this listener.

  • hostname (default: #f)

Use string "hostname" in the greeting banner instead of the default server name.

  • hostnames (default: #f)

Override the server name for specific addresses. Use a <opensmtpd-table-configuration> containing a mapping of string IP addresses to hostnames. If the address on which the connection arrives appears in the mapping, the associated hostname is used.

  • mask-src (default: #f)

If #t, then omit the from part when prepending “Received” headers.

  • disable-dsn (default: #f)

When #t, then disable the DSN (Delivery Status Notification) extension.

  • pki (default: #f)

For secure connections, use an ~~ to prove a mail server's identity.

  • port (default: #f)

Listen on the integer port instead of the default port of 25.

  • proxy-v2 (default: #f)

If #t, then support the PROXYv2 protocol, rewriting appropriately source address received from proxy.

  • received-auth (default: #f)

If #t, then in “Received” headers, report whether the session was authenticated and by which local user.

  • senders (default: #f)

Look up the authenticated user in the supplied <opensmtpd-table-configuration> to find the email addresses that user is allowed to submit mail as.

  • secure-connection (default: #f)

This is a string of one of these options:

|----------------------+---------------------------------------------| | "smtps" | Support SMTPS, by default on port 465. | | | | | "tls" | Support STARTTLS, by default on port 25. | | | | | "tls-require-verify" | Like tls, but force clients to establish | | | a secure connection before being allowed to | | | start an SMTP transaction. With the verify | | | option, clients must also provide a valid | | | certificate to establish an SMTP session. | |----------------------+---------------------------------------------|

  • tag (default: #f)

Clients connecting to the listener are tagged with the given string tag.

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-socket

Data type representing the configuration of an <opensmtpd-socket>. Listen for incoming SMTP connections on the Unix domain socket /var/run/smtpd.sock. This is done by default, even if the directive is absent.

  • filters (default: #f)

A list of one or many <opensmtpd-filter-configuration> or <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration> records. These filter incoming connections handled by this listener.

  • mask-src (default: #f)

If #t, then omit the from part when prepending “Received” headers.

  • tag (default: #f)

Clients connecting to the listener are tagged with the given string tag.

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-match-configuration

This data type represents the configuration of an <opensmtpd-match-configuration> record.

If at least one mail envelope matches the options of one match record, receive the incoming message, put a copy into each matching envelope, and atomically save the envelopes to the mail spool for later processing by the respective <opensmtpd-action-configuration> found in fieldname action.

  • action (default: #f)

If mail matches this match configuration, then do this action. Valid values include <opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration> or <opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration>.

  • options (default: #f) <opensmtpd-option-configuration>
  • The fieldname 'option' is a list of unique ~~ records.

Each <opensmtpd-option-configuration> record's fieldname 'option' has some mutually exclusive options: there can be only one "for" and only one "from" option.

|--------------------------------+--------------------------------| | for | from | |--------------------------------+--------------------------------| | only use one of the following: | only use one of the following: | |--------------------------------+--------------------------------| | "for any" | "from any" | | "for local" | "from auth" | | "for domain" | "from local" | | "for rcpt-to" | "from mail-from" | | | "from socket" | | | "from src" | |--------------------------------+--------------------------------|

The following matching options are supported and can all be negated (via not #t). The options that support a table (anything surrounded with '<' and '>' eg:

), also support specifying regex via (regex #t).

  • for any

Specify that session may address any destination.

  • for local

Specify that session may address any local domain. This is the default, and may be omitted.

  • for domain _domain_ | <domain>

Specify that session may address the string or list table domain.

  • for rcpt-to _recipient_ | <recipient>

Specify that session may address the string or list table recipient.

  • from any

Specify that session may originate from any source.

  • from auth

Specify that session may originate from any authenticated user, no matter the source IP address.

  • from auth _user_ | <user>

Specify that session may originate from authenticated user or user list user, no matter the source IP address.

  • from local

Specify that session may only originate from a local IP address, or from the local enqueuer. This is the default, and may be omitted.

  • from mail-from _sender_ | <sender>

Specify that session may originate from sender or table sender, no matter the source IP address.

  • from rdns

Specify that session may only originate from an IP address that resolves to a reverse DNS.

  • from rdns _hostname_ | <hostname>

Specify that session may only originate from an IP address that resolves to a reverse DNS matching string or list string hostname.

  • from socket

Specify that session may only originate from the local enqueuer.

  • from src _address_ | <address>

Specify that session may only originate from string or list table address which can be a specific address or a subnet expressed in CIDR-notation.

  • auth

Matches transactions which have been authenticated.

  • auth _username_ | <username>

Matches transactions which have been authenticated for user or user list username.

  • helo _helo-name_ | <helo-name>

Specify that session's HELO / EHLO should match the string or list table helo-name.

  • mail-from _sender_ | <sender>

Specify that transactions's MAIL FROM should match the string or list table sender.

  • rcpt-to _recipient_ | <recipient>

Specify that transaction's RCPT TO should match the string or list table recipient.

  • tag tag
  • Matches transactions tagged with the given _tag_.
  • tls
  • Specify that transaction should take place in a TLS channel.

Here is a simple example that rejects email from the domains =gnu.org= or =dismail.de=: #+BEGIN_SRC scheme (opensmtpd-option-configuration (not #t) (regex #f) (option "for domain") (data (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "domain-table") (data (list "gnu.org" "dismail.de"))))) #+END_SRC

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration

This data type represents the configuration of an <opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration> record.

  • name (default: #f)

name is the string name of the relay action.

  • method (default: "mbox")

The email delivery option. Valid options are:

  • "mbox"

Deliver the message to the user's mbox with mail.local(8).

  • "expand-only"

Only accept the message if a delivery method was specified in an aliases or _.forward file_.

  • "forward-only"

Only accept the message if the recipient results in a remote address after the processing of aliases or forward file.

  • <opensmtpd-lmtp-configuration>

Deliver the message to an LMTP server at <opensmtpd-lmtp-configuration>~'s fieldname ~destination. The location may be expressed as string host:port or as a UNIX socket. Optionally, <opensmtpd-lmtp-configuration>~'s fieldname ~rcpt-to might be specified to use the recipient email address (after expansion) instead of the local user in the LMTP session as RCPT TO.

  • <opensmtpd-maildir-configuration>

Deliver the message to the maildir in <opensmtpd-maildir-configuration>~'s fieldname ~pathname if specified, or by default to ~/Maildir.

The pathname may contain format specifiers that are expanded before use (see the below section about Format Specifiers).

If <opensmtpd-maildir-configuration>~'s record fieldname ~junk is #t, then message will be moved to the ‘Junk’ folder if it contains a positive ‘X-Spam’ header. This folder will be created under fieldname pathname if it does not yet exist.

  • <opensmtpd-mda-configuration>

Delegate the delivery to the <opensmtpd-mda-configuration>~'s fieldname ~command (type string) that receives the message on its standard input.

The command may contain format specifiers that are expanded before use (see Format Specifiers).

  • alias (default: #f)

Use the mapping table for aliases expansion. alias is an <opensmtpd-table-configuration>.

  • ttl (default: #f)

ttl is a string specify how long a message may remain in the queue. It's format is n{s|m|h|d}. eg: "4m" is four minutes.

  • user (default: #f )

user is the string username for performing the delivery, to be looked up with getpwnam(3).

This is used for virtual hosting where a single username is in charge of handling delivery for all virtual users.

This option is not usable with the mbox delivery method.

  • userbase (default: #f)

userbase is an <opensmtpd-table-configuration> record for mapping user lookups instead of the getpwnam(3) function.

The fieldnames user and userbase are mutually exclusive.

  • virtual (default: #f)

virtual is an <opensmtpd-table-configuration> record is used for virtual expansion. # TODO man 5 smtpd.conf says "The aliasing table format is described in # table(5)." What is virtual expansion? I do NOT know how to use ~virtual~ # properly. What sort of do I need? does the # below work? # (opensmtpd-table (name "virtual") (data '(("joshua" . "jbranso@dismail.de"))))

# TODO fix this wrapper documentation. Should it accept an # ? If so, then I need to write an # - wrapper (default: )

# TODO double check that these options are all correct

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration

This data type represents the configuration of an <opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration> record.

  • name (default: #f)

name is the string name of the relay action.

  • backup (default: #f)

When #t, operate as a backup mail exchanger delivering messages to any mail exchanger with higher priority.

  • backup-mx (default: #f)

Operate as a backup mail exchanger delivering messages to any mail exchanger with higher priority than mail exchanger identified as string name.

  • helo (default: #f)

Advertise string heloname as the hostname to other mail exchangers during the HELO phase.

  • helo-src (default: #f)

Use the mapping <openmstpd-table-configuration> to look up a hostname matching the source address, to advertise during the HELO phase.

  • domain (default: #f)

Do not perform MX lookups but look up destination domain in an <opensmtpd-table-configuration> and use matching relay url as relay host.

  • host (default: #f)

Do not perform MX lookups but relay messages to the relay host described by the string relay-url. The format for relay-url is [proto://[label@]]host[:port]. The following protocols are available:

|------------+----------------------------------------------------------------| | smtp | Normal SMTP session with opportunistic STARTTLS (the default). | | smtp+tls | Normal SMTP session with mandatory STARTTLS. | | smtp+notls | Plain text SMTP session without TLS. | | lmtp | LMTP session. port is required. | | smtps | SMTP session with forced TLS on connection, default port is | | | 465. | |------------+----------------------------------------------------------------|

Unless noted, port defaults to 25.

The label corresponds to an entry in a credentials table, as documented in table(5). It is used with the "smtp+tls" and "smtps" protocols for authentication. Server certificates for those protocols are verified by default.

  • pki (default: #f)

For secure connections, use the certificate associated with <opensmtpd-pki-configuration> (declared in a pki directive) to prove the client's identity to the remote mail server.

  • srs (default: #f)

If #t, then when relaying a mail resulting from a forward, use the Sender Rewriting Scheme to rewrite sender address.

  • tls (default: #f) boolean or string "no-verify"

When #t, Require TLS to be used when relaying, using mandatory STARTTLS by default. When used with a smarthost, the protocol must not be "smtp+notls://". When string "no-verify", then do not require a valid certificate.

  • auth (default: #f) <opensmtpd-table-configuration>

Use the alist <opensmtpd-table-configuration> for connecting to relay-url using credentials. This option is usable only with fieldname host option.

  • mail-from (default: #f) string

Use the string mailaddress as MAIL FROM address within the SMTP transaction.

  • src (default: #f) string | <opensmtpd-table-configuration>

Use the string or <opensmtpd-table-configuration> sourceaddr for the source IP address, which is useful on machines with multiple interfaces. If the list contains more than one address, all of them are used in such a way that traffic is routed as efficiently as possible.

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-filter-configuration
  • @c The code does NOT actually support these things yet.

This data type represents the configuration of an <opensmtpd-filter-configuration>. This is the filter record one should use if they want to use an external package to filter email eg: rspamd or spamassassin.

  • name (default: #f)

The string name of the filter.

  • proc (default: #f)

# TODO let proc be a gexp The string command or process name. If proc-exec is #t, proc is treated as a command to execute. Otherwise, it is a process name.

  • proc-exec (default: #f)
  • Data Type: opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration

This data type represents the configuration of an <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration>.

In a regular workflow, smtpd(8) may accept or reject a message based only on the content of envelopes. Its decisions are about the handling of the message, not about the handling of an active session.

Filtering extends the decision making process by allowing smtpd(8) to stop at each phase of an SMTP session, check that options are met, then decide if a session is allowed to move forward.

With filtering via an <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration> record, a session may be interrupted at any phase before an envelope is complete. A message may also be rejected after being submitted, regardless of whether the envelope was accepted or not.

  • name (default: #f)

The string name of the filter phase.

  • phase-name (default: #f)

The string name of the phase. Valid values are:

|-------------+-----------------------------------------------| | "connect" | upon connection, before a banner is displayed | | "helo" | after HELO command is submitted | | "ehlo" | after EHLO command is submitted | | "mail-from" | after MAIL FROM command is submitted | | "rcpt-to" | after RCPT TO command is submitted | | "data" | after DATA command is submitted | | "commit" | after message is fully is submitted | |-------------+-----------------------------------------------|

  • options (default #f)

A list of unique <opensmtpd-option-configuration> records.

At each phase, various options, specified by a list of <opensmtpd-option-configuration>, may be checked. The <opensmtpd-option-configuration>~'s fieldname 'option' values of: "fcrdns", "rdns", and "src" data are available in all phases, but other data must have been already submitted before they are available. Options with a =<table>= next to them require the ~<opensmtpd-option-configuration>~'s fieldname ~data to be an <opensmtpd-table-configuration>. These are the available options:

|-------------------+----------------------------------------| | fcrdns | forward-confirmed reverse DNS is valid | | rdns | session has a reverse DNS | | rdns

| session has a reverse DNS in table | | src
| source address is in table | | helo
| helo name is in table | | auth | session is authenticated | | auth
| session username is in table | | mail-from
| sender address is in table | | rcpt-to
| recipient address is in table | |-------------------+----------------------------------------|

These conditions may all be negated by setting <opensmtpd-option-configuration>~'s fieldname ~not to #t.

Any conditions that require a table may indicate that tables include regexs setting <opensmtpd-option-configuration>~'s fieldname ~regex to #t.

  • decision

A string decision to be taken. Some decisions require an message or value. Valid strings are:

|----------------------+------------------------------------------------| | "bypass" | the session or transaction bypasses filters | |----------------------+------------------------------------------------| | "disconnect" message | the session is disconnected with message | |----------------------+------------------------------------------------| | "junk" | the session or transaction is junked, i.e., an | | | ‘X-Spam: yes’ header is added to any messages | |----------------------+------------------------------------------------| | "reject" message | the command is rejected with message | |----------------------+------------------------------------------------| | "rewrite" value | the command parameter is rewritten with value | |----------------------+------------------------------------------------|

Decisions that involve a message require that the message be RFC valid, meaning that they should either start with a 4xx or 5xx status code. Descisions can be taken at any phase, though junking can only happen before a message is committed.

  • message (default #f)

A string message beginning with a 4xx or 5xx status code.

  • value (default: #f)

A number value. value and message are mutually exclusive.

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-option-configuration

This data type represents the configuration of an <opensmtpd-option-configuration>, which is used by <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration> and ~~ to match various options for email.

  • conditition (default #f)

A string option to be taken. Some options require a string or an <opensmtpd-table-configuration> via the fieldname data. When the option record is used inside of an <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration>, then valid strings are:

At each phase, various options may be matched. The fcrdns, rdns, and src data are available in all phases, but other data must have been already submitted before they are available.

|---------------------+----------------------------------------| | "fcrdns" | forward-confirmed reverse DNS is valid | | "rdns" | session has a reverse DNS | | "rdns"

| session has a reverse DNS in table | | "src"
| source address is in table | | "helo"
| helo name is in table | | "auth" | session is authenticated | | "auth"
| session username is in table | | "mail-from"
| sender address is in table | | "rcpt-to"
| recipient address is in table | |---------------------+----------------------------------------|

When <opensmtpd-option-configuration> is used inside of an <opensmtpd-match-configuration>, then valid strigs for fieldname ~option~ are: "for", "for any", "for local", "for domain", "for rcpt-to", "from any" "from auth", "from local", "from mail-from", "from rdns", "from socket", "from src", "auth", "helo", "mail-from", "rcpt-to", "tag", or "tls".

  • data (default #f) <opensmtpd-table-configuration>
    Some options require a table to be present. One would specify that table here.
  • regex (default: #f) boolean
    Any options using a table may indicate that tables hold regex by prefixing the table name with the keyword regex.
  • not (default: #f) boolean

When #t, this option record is negated.

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-table-configuration

This data type represents the configuration of an <opensmtpd-table-configuration>.

  • name (default #f)

name is the name of the <opensmtpd-table-configuration> record.

  • data (default: #f)

data expects a list of strings or an alist, which is a list of cons cells. eg: (data (list ("james" . "password"))) OR (data (list ("gnu.org" "fsf.org"))).

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-pki-configuration

This data type represents the configuration of an <opensmtpd-pki-configuration>.

  • domain (default #f)

domain is the string name of the <opensmtpd-pki-configuration> record.

  • cert (default: #f)

cert (default: #f)

cert is the string certificate filename to use for this pki.

  • key (default: #f)

key is the string certificate falename to use for this pki.

  • dhe (default: "none")

Specify the DHE string parameter to use for DHE cipher suites with host pkiname. Valid parameter values are "none", "legacy", or "auto". For "legacy", a fixed key length of 1024 bits is used, whereas for "auto", the key length is determined automatically. The default is "none", which disables DHE cipher suites.

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-maildir-configuration
  • pathname (default: "~/Maildir")

Deliver the message to the maildir if pathname if specified, or by default to ~/Maildir.

The pathname may contain format specifiers that are expanded before use (see FORMAT SPECIFIERS).

  • junk (default: #f)

If the junk argument is #t, then the message will be moved to the ‘Junk’= folder if it contains a positive =‘X-Spam’ header. This folder will be created under pathname if it does not yet exist.

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-mda-configuration
  • # Do we need a dataypte for mda configuration? # this could just be a gexp in the fieldname opensmtpd-configuration-mda
  • name

The string name for this MDA command.

  • command

Delegate the delivery to a command that receives the message on its standard input.

The command may contain format specifiers that are expanded before use (see FORMAT SPECIFIERS).

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-queue-configuration
  • compression (default #f)

Store queue files in a compressed format. This may be useful to save disk space.

  • encryption (default #f)

Encrypt queue files with EVP_aes_256_gcm(3). If no key is specified, it is read with getpass(3). If the string stdin or a single dash (‘-’) is given instead of a key, the key is read from the standard input.

  • ttl-delay (default #f)

Set the default expiration time for temporarily undeliverable messages, given as a positive decimal integer followed by a unit s, m, h, or d. The default is four days ("4d").

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-smtp-configuration

Data type representing an <opensmtpd-smtp-configuration> record.

  • ciphers (default: #f)

Set the control string for SSL_CTX_set_cipher_list(3). The default is "HIGH:!aNULL:!MD5".

  • limit-max-mails (default: 100)

Limit the number of messages to count for each sessio

  • limit-max-rcpt (default: 1000)

Limit the number of recipients to count for each transaction.

  • max-message-size (default: 35M)

Reject messages larger than size, given as a positive number of bytes or as a string to be parsed with scan_scaled(3).

  • sub-addr-delim character (default: +)

When resolving the local part of a local email address, ignore the ASCII character and all characters following it. This is helpful for email filters. "admin+bills@gnu.org" is the same email address as "admin@gnu.org". BUT an email filter can filter emails addressed to first email address into a 'Bills' email folder.

  • Data Type: opensmtpd-srs-configuration
  • key (default: #f)

Set the secret key to use for SRS, the Sender Rewriting Scheme.

  • backup-key (default: #f)
    Set a backup secret key to use as a fallback for SRS. This can be used to implement SRS key rotation.
  • ttl-delay (default: "4d")

Set the time-to-live delay for SRS envelopes. After this delay, a bounce reply to the SRS address will be discarded to limit risks of forged addresses.

  • Format Specifiers

Some configuration records support expansion of their parameters at runtime. Such records (for example <opensmtpd-maildir-configuration>, <opensmtpd-mda-configuration>) may use format specifiers which are expanded before delivery or relaying. The following formats are currently supported:

|---------------------+-------------------------------------------------------| | %{sender} | sender email address, may be empty string | | %{sender.user} | user part of the sender email address, may be empty | | %{sender.domain} | domain part of the sender email address, may be empty | | %{rcpt} | recipient email address | | %{rcpt.user} | user part of the recipient email address | | %{rcpt.domain} | domain part of the recipient email address | | %{dest} | recipient email address after expansion | | %{dest.user} | user part after expansion | | %{dest.domain} | domain part after expansion | | %{user.username} | local user | | %{user.directory} | home directory of the local user | | %{mbox.from} | name used in mbox From separator lines | | %{mda} | mda command, only available for mda wrappers | |---------------------+-------------------------------------------------------|

Expansion formats also support partial expansion using the optional bracket notations with substring offset. For example, with recipient domain =“example.org”=:

|------------------------+----------------------| | %{rcpt.domain[0]} | expands to “e” | | %{rcpt.domain[1]} | expands to “x” | | %{rcpt.domain[8:]} | expands to “org” | | %{rcpt.domain[-3:]} | expands to “org” | | %{rcpt.domain[0:6]} | expands to “example” | | %{rcpt.domain[0:-4]} | expands to “example” | |------------------------+----------------------|

In addition, modifiers may be applied to the token. For example, with recipient =“User+Tag@Example.org”=:

|--------------------------+-----------------------------------| | %{rcpt:lowercase} | expands to “user+tag@example.org” | | %{rcpt:uppercase} | expands to “USER+TAG@EXAMPLE.ORG” | | %{rcpt:strip} | expands to “User@Example.org” | | %{rcpt:lowercasestrip} | expands to “user@example.org” | |--------------------------+-----------------------------------|

For security concerns, expanded values are sanitized and potentially dangerous characters are replaced with ‘:’. In situations where they are desirable, the “raw” modifier may be applied. For example, with recipient =“user+t?g@example.org”=:

COMMENT some example <opensmtpd-configurations> that are probably out of date

|---------------+-----------------------------------| | %{rcpt} | expands to “user+t:g@example.org” | | %{rcpt:raw} | expands to “user+t?g@example.org” | |---------------+-----------------------------------|

#+BEGIN_SRC scheme

;;this works! (opensmtpd-configuration->mixed-text-file (opensmtpd-configuration (smtp (opensmtpd-smtp-configuration (limit-max-rcpt 10)))))

;; (tables (list ;; (opensmtpd-table-configuration ;; (name "aliases") ;; (data ;; (list ;; (cons "webmaster" "root") ;; (cons "postmaster" "root") ;; (cons "abuse" "root")))) ;; ;; (opensmtpd-table-configuration ;; (name "vdoms") ;; (data (list "gnucode.me" ;; "gnu-hurd.com"))) ;; (opensmtpd-table-configuration ;; (name (opensmtpd-table-configuration ;; (name "virtual") ;; (data (list "root" "postmaster@gnu.org")))) ;; (data (list (cons "joshua@gnucode.me" "joshua") ;; (cons "jbranso@gnucode.me" "joshua") ;; (cons "postmaster@gnucode.me" "joshua"))))))

;; (filter-chains ;; (list ;; (opensmtpd-filter-chain ;; (name "dropDumbEmails") ;; (filter-names (list "nofcrdnsDisconnect" ;; "nordnsDisconnect"))))) ;; (filter-phases ;; (list (opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration ;; (name "nofcrdnsDisconnect") ;; (phase-name "connect") ;; (options (list "!fcrdns")) ;; (decision "disconnect") ;; (message "You have not set up forward confirmed DNS.")) ;; (opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration ;; (name "nordnsDisconnect") ;; (phase-name "connect") ;; (options (list "!rdns")) ;; ;; (decision "reject") ;; (message "You have not set up reverse DNS.")))) ;; (define example-opensmtpd-config-smaller (opensmtpd-configuration (listen-ons (list ;; this forum help suggests that I listen on 0.0.0.0 and NOT eth0 ;; https://serverfault.com/questions/726795/opensmtpd-wont-work-at-reboot ;; this listens for email from the outside world ;; this lets local users logged into the system via ssh send email (opensmtpd-interface (interface "wlp2s0") (port 465)))) (matches (list (opensmtpd-match-configuration (name "maildir") (action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration (method (opensmtpd-maildir-configuration (pathname "/home/%{rcpt.user}/Maildir") (junk #t))) (virtual (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "virtual") (data (list "root" "james@gnu.org")))))) (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "for local"))))))))

(define example-opensmtpd-config-small (let ([interface "wlp2s0"] [creds (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "creds") (data (list (cons "joshua" "$6$Ec4m8FgKjT2F/03Y$k66ABdse9TzCX6qaALB3WBL9GC1rmAWJmaoSjFMpbhzat7DOpFqpnOwpbZ34wwsQYIK8RQlqwM1I/v6vsRq86."))))] [receive-action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration (name "receive") (method (opensmtpd-maildir-configuration (pathname "/home/%{rcpt.user}/Maildir") (junk #t))) (virtual (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "virtual") (data (list "root" "james@gnu.org")))))] [smtp.gnucode.me (opensmtpd-pki-configuration (domain "smtp.gnucode.me") (cert "opensmtpd.scm") (key "opensmtpd.scm"))]) (opensmtpd-configuration (listen-ons (list ;; this forum help suggests that I listen on 0.0.0.0 and NOT eth0 ;; https://serverfault.com/questions/726795/opensmtpd-wont-work-at-reboot ;; this listens for email from the outside world (opensmtpd-interface (interface interface) (port 25) (secure-connection "tls") (pki smtp.gnucode.me)) ;; this lets local users logged into the system via ssh send email (opensmtpd-interface (interface interface) (port 465) (secure-connection "smtps") (pki smtp.gnucode.me) (auth creds)))) (matches (list (opensmtpd-match-configuration (action receive-action) (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "for local")))))))))

(define example-opensmtpd-config (let ([interface "lo"] [creds (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "creds") (data (list (cons "joshua" "$6$Ec4m8FgKjT2F/03Y$k66ABdse9TzCX6qaALB3WBL9GC1rmAWJmaoSjFMpbhzat7DOpFqpnOwpbZ34wwsQYIK8RQlqwM1I/v6vsRq86."))))] [receive-action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration (name "receive") (method (opensmtpd-maildir-configuration (pathname "/home/%{rcpt.user}/Maildir") (junk #t))) (virtual (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "virtual") (data (list "josh" "jbranso@dismail.de")))))] [smtp.gnucode.me (opensmtpd-pki-configuration (domain "smtp.gnucode.me") (cert "opensmtpd.scm") (key "opensmtpd.scm"))]) (opensmtpd-configuration ;; (mta-max-deferred 50) ;; (queue ;; (opensmtpd-queue-configuration ;; (compression #t))) ;; (smtp ;; (opensmtpd-smtp-configuration ;; (max-message-size "10M"))) ;; (srs ;; (opensmtpd-srs-configuration ;; (ttl-delay "5d"))) (listen-ons (list ;; this forum help suggests that I listen on 0.0.0.0 and NOT eth0 ;; https://serverfault.com/questions/726795/opensmtpd-wont-work-at-reboot ;; this listens for email from the outside world (opensmtpd-interface (interface interface) (port 25) (secure-connection "tls") (pki smtp.gnucode.me)) ;; this lets local users logged into the system via ssh send email (opensmtpd-interface (interface "lo") (port 25) (secure-connection "tls") (pki smtp.gnucode.me)) (opensmtpd-interface (interface interface) (port 465) (secure-connection "smtps") (pki smtp.gnucode.me) (auth creds) ;;(filter ) ) (opensmtpd-interface (interface interface) (port 587) (secure-connection "tls-require") (pki smtp.gnucode.me) (auth creds)))) (matches (list (opensmtpd-match-configuration (action (opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration (name "send"))) (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "for any"))) (from (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "from any"))) (auth (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "auth")))) (opensmtpd-match-configuration (action receive-action) (from (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "from any"))) (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "for domain") (value (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com"))))) (opensmtpd-match-configuration (action receive-action) (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration (option "for local"))))))))) #+END_SRC

COMMENT some example smtpd.conf configs

COMMENT serving multiple domains with one pki

source: https://www.reddit.com/r/openbsd/comments/n41wkz/how_to_host_different_domains_for_an_email_server/


​pki mail.primary.domain cert​pki mail.primary.domain cert "/etc/ssl/mail.primary.domain.fullchain.pem"

pki mail.primary.domain key "/etc/ssl/private/mail.primary.domain.key"


filter check_dyndns phase connect match rdns regex { '.*\.dyn\..*', '.*\.dsl\..*' } \

disconnect "550 no residential connections"


filter check_rdns phase connect match !rdns \

disconnect "550 no rDNS is so 80s"


filter check_fcrdns phase connect match !fcrdns \

disconnect "550 no FCrDNS is so 80s"


filter senderscore \

proc-exec "filter-senderscore -blockBelow 10 -junkBelow 70 -slowFactor 5000"


filter rspamd proc-exec "filter-rspamd"


table usermap file:/etc/mail/usermap

table credentials file:/etc/mail/credentials

table domains { primary.domain, second.domain }


listen on all tls pki mail.primary.domain \

filter { check_dyndns, check_rdns, check_fcrdns, senderscore, rspamd }


listen on egress port 465 smtps pki mail.primary.domain \

auth ~<credentials>~ filter rspamd


action "inbound" lmtp "/var/dovecot/lmtp" rcpt-to virtual ~<usermap>~ #maildir junk alias <aliases>

action "outbound" relay helo mail.primary.domain


match from any for domain ~<domains>~ action "inbound"

match for local action "inbound"


match from any auth for any action "outbound"

match for any action "outbound" "/etc/ssl/mail.primary.domain.fullchain.pem"

pki mail.primary.domain key "/etc/ssl/private/mail.primary.domain.key"


filter check_dyndns phase connect match rdns regex { '.*\.dyn\..*', '.*\.dsl\..*' } \

disconnect "550 no residential connections"


filter check_rdns phase connect match !rdns \

disconnect "550 no rDNS is so 80s"


filter check_fcrdns phase connect match !fcrdns \

disconnect "550 no FCrDNS is so 80s"


filter senderscore \

proc-exec "filter-senderscore -blockBelow 10 -junkBelow 70 -slowFactor 5000"


filter rspamd proc-exec "filter-rspamd"


table usermap file:/etc/mail/usermap

table credentials file:/etc/mail/credentials

table domains { primary.domain, second.domain }


listen on all tls pki mail.primary.domain \

filter { check_dyndns, check_rdns, check_fcrdns, senderscore, rspamd }


listen on egress port 465 smtps pki mail.primary.domain \

auth ~<credentials>~ filter rspamd


action "inbound" lmtp "/var/dovecot/lmtp" rcpt-to virtual ~<usermap>~ #maildir junk alias <aliases>

action "outbound" relay helo mail.primary.domain


match from any for domain ~<domains>~ action "inbound"

match for local action "inbound"


match from any auth for any action "outbound"

match for any action "outbound"

PROJ nice things to have [0/9]

TODO Should I delete <opensmtpd-mda-configuration> ? or fieldname 'opensmtpd-configuration-mda-wrapppers'?

~~'s fieldname 'method' allows for an mda configuration. BUT instead of an mda-configuration record, you could just use a list of strings and/or gexps.


 mda wrapper name command
             Associate command with the mail delivery agent wrapper named name.  When a local
             delivery specifies a wrapper, the command associated with the wrapper will be ex‐
             ecuted instead.  The command may contain format specifiers (see FORMAT
             SPECIFIERS).

If I choose to NOT delete <opensmtpd-mda-configuration>, then should I delete 'opensmtpd-configuration-mda-wrapppers'?

Also should I delete the opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration-wrapper?

TODO make the 'auth-optional' and 'auth' fieldnames for <opensmtpd-interface> autoencrypt passwords. [0/0]

Guix makes it pretty hard to find the openbsd binary file that encrypts passwords for you. If I can progmatically find this file, it would be nice to autoencrypt the users's passwords for you.

What does this mean practically? Suppose that a user sets up their config this way: In file passwords.scm (which is NOT in the git repo).


(define-module (passwords)
  #:use-module (gnu services mail))

(define creds-table
  (opensmtpd-table-configuration
   (name "credentials")
   (data '(("joshua@gnu.org" . "somePassword")
           ("postmaster@gnu.org") . "anotherSillyPassword"))))

Then in their config.scm


(use-modules (passwords))

(opensmtpd-interface
               (interface interface)
               (port 465)
               (secure-connection "smtps")
               (pki smtp.gnucode.me)
               (auth creds-table)
               (filters (list filter-dkimsign)))

Guix will then generate a smtpd.conf file =/gnu/store/saenthuseantaeueuaua/smtpd.conf= as something like:


table credentials { joshua@gnu.org = $some$Long$EncrytpedPassword, \
                    postmaster@gnu.org = $some$Long$Other$EncrytpedPassword }

You would need to encourage users NOT to have passwords in a public git repo. With guile-git, it might be possible to sanitize the config, to ensure that the passwords are NOT stored in the git repo.

PROJ Why does (opensmtpd-configuration) take so long to initialize? [0/1]

For example, try to initialize this bit of code. It takes almost 5 seconds.


(let ([interface "lo"]
               [creds-table (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                             (name "creds")
                             (data
                              (list
                               (cons "joshua"
                                     "$6$Ec4m8FgKjT2F/03Y$k66ABdse9TzCX6qaALB3WBL9GC1rmAWJmaoSjFMpbhzat7DOpFqpnOwpbZ34wwsQYIK8RQlqwM1I/v6vsRq86."))))]
               [receive-action (opensmtpd-action-local-delivery-configuration
                                (name "receive")
                                (method (opensmtpd-maildir-configuration
                                         (pathname "/home/%{rcpt.user}/Maildir")
                                         (junk #t)))
                                (virtual (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                                          (name "virtual")
                                          (data (list "josh" "jbranso@dismail.de")))))]
               [filter-dkimsign (opensmtpd-filter
                                 (name "dkimsign")
                                 (exec #t)
                                 (proc (string-append "/path/to/dkimsign  -d gnucode.me -s 2021-09-22 -c relaxed/relaxed -k "
                                                      "/path/to/dkimsign-key user nobody group nobody")))]
               [smtp.gnucode.me (opensmtpd-pki-configuration
                                 (domain "smtp.gnucode.me")
                                 (cert "opensmtpd.scm")
                                 (key "opensmtpd.scm"))])
           (opensmtpd-configuration
            (mta-max-deferred 50)
            (queue
             (opensmtpd-queue-configuration
              (compression #t)))
            (smtp
             (opensmtpd-smtp-configuration
              (max-message-size "10M")))
            (srs
             (opensmtpd-srs-configuration
              (ttl-delay "5d")))
            (listen-ons
             (list
              (opensmtpd-interface
               (interface interface)
               (port 25)
               (secure-connection "tls")
               (filters (list (opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration
                               (name "noFRDNS")
                               (phase "commit")
                               (options (list (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                                                  (option "fcrdns")
                                                  (not #t))))
                               (decision "disconnect")
                               (message "No FCRDNS"))))
               (pki smtp.gnucode.me))
              ;; this lets local users logged into the system via ssh send email
              (opensmtpd-interface
               (interface interface)
               (port 465)
               (secure-connection "smtps")
               (pki smtp.gnucode.me)
               (auth creds-table)
               (filters (list filter-dkimsign)))
              (opensmtpd-interface
               (interface interface)
               (port 587)
               (secure-connection "tls-require")
               (pki smtp.gnucode.me)
               (auth creds-table)
               (filters (list filter-dkimsign)))))
            (matches (list
                      (opensmtpd-match-configuration
                       (action (opensmtpd-action-relay-configuration
                                (name "relay")))
                       (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                             (option "for any")))
                       (from (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                              (option "from any")))
                       (auth (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                              (option "auth"))))
                      (opensmtpd-match-configuration
                       (action receive-action)
                       (from (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                              (option "from any")))
                       (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                             (option "for domain")
                             (value (opensmtpd-table-configuration
                                     (name "domain-table")
                                     (data (list "gnucode.me" "gnu-hurd.com")))))))
                      (opensmtpd-match-configuration
                       (action receive-action)
                       (for (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                             (option "for local"))))))))

TODO one area to look for speed up improvements would be in the sanitize function of (opensmtpd-interface-filters).

PROJ check the code base for places to use apply, map, fold, eval, or remove [3/4]

DONE string-in-list would be a good place. maybe is-value-right-type


(define (string-in-list? string list)
  (if (null? list)
      #f
      (if (and (string? (car list)) (string=? string (car list)))
          #t
          (string-in-list? string (cdr list)))))

(define (string-in-list? string list)
  (primitive-eval (cons 'or (map (lambda (var) (string=? string var)) list))))

DONE contains-duplicate


(define (contains-duplicate? list)
  (if (null? list)
      #f
      (or
       ;;<check whether (first list) is in (rest list)>
       (let loop ([list (cdr list)]
                  [1st (car list)])
         (if (null? list)
             #f
             (if (equal? 1st (car list))
                 (data #t 1st)
                 (loop (cdr list) 1st))))
       ;;<check where (rest list) contains a duplicate>
       (contains-duplicate? (cdr list)))))

(define (contains-duplicate? list)
  (if (null? list)
      #f
      (or (primitive-eval (cons 'or     ; check if (car list) is in (cdr list)
                                (map (lambda (var) (equal? var (car list)))
                                     (cdr list))))
          ;; check if (cdr list) contains duplicate
          (contains-duplicate? (cdr list)))))

DONE using remove and flatten and map


(define (get-opensmtpd-table-configurations value)
  (delete-duplicates
   (let loop ([list (flatten
                     (cond ((opensmtpd-table-configuration? value)
                            value)
                           ((record? value)
                            (let* ([<record-type> (record-type-descriptor value)]
                                   [list-of-record-fieldnames (record-type-fields <record-type>)])
                              (map (lambda (fieldname)
                                     (get-opensmtpd-table-configurations ((record-accessor <record-type> fieldname) value)))
                                   list-of-record-fieldnames)))
                           ((and (list? value) (not (null? list)))
                            (map (lambda (element-in-list)
                                   (if (record? element-in-list)
                                       (get-opensmtpd-table-configurations element-in-list)
                                       #f))
                                 value))))])
     (if (null? list)
         '()
         (if (opensmtpd-table-configuration? (car list))
             (cons (car list) (loop (cdr list)))
             (loop (cdr list)))))))

(define (get-opensmtpd-table-configurations value)
   (let loop ([list (flatten ;; turn (list '(1) '(2 '(3))) -> '(1 2 3)
                     (cond ((opensmtpd-table-configuration? value)
                            value)
                           ((record? value)
                            (let* ([<record-type> (record-type-descriptor value)]
                                   [list-of-record-fieldnames (record-type-fields <record-type>)])
                              (map (lambda (fieldname)
                                     (get-opensmtpd-table-configurations ((record-accessor <record-type> fieldname) value)))
                                   list-of-record-fieldnames)))
                           ((and (list? value) (not (null? list)))
                            (map (lambda (element-in-list)
                                   (if (record? element-in-list)
                                       (get-opensmtpd-table-configurations element-in-list)
                                       #f))
                                 value))))])
     (delete-duplicates (partition opensmtpd-table-configuration? list))))

TODO using map, apply, and fold is certainly awesome, but is it less efficient?

For example, list-of-type? using a named let is pretty efficient. It loops through the list once.


(define (list-of-type? list proc?)
  (if (and (list? list)
           (not (null? list)))
      (let loop ([list list])
        (if (null? list)
            #t
            (if (proc? (car list))
                (loop (cdr list))
                #f)))
      #f))

BUT when I using map on this, it is slightly less efficient. It has to apply a simple procedure to each element in the list. Then it has to return the list of booleans. Then it has to build the primitive eval list, then it has to eval it.


(define (list-of-type? list proc?)
  (if (and (list? list)
           (not (null? list)))
      (primitive-eval (cons 'and
                            (map (lambda (var)
                                   (if (proc? var)
                                       #t
                                       #f))
                                 list)))
      #f))

PROJ improve [0/2]

TODO it would be nice if <opensmtpd-table-configuration> supported aliasing tables, as described in man 5 table


   Aliasing tables
     Aliasing tables are mappings that associate a recipient to one or many destinations.  They can be
     used in two contexts: primary domain aliases and virtual domain mapping.

           action name method alias <table>
           action name method virtual <table>

     In a primary domain context, the key is the user part of the recipient address, whilst the value
     is one or many recipients as described in aliases(5):

           user1   otheruser
           user2   otheruser1,otheruser2
           user3   otheruser@example.com

     In a virtual domain context, the key is either a user part, a full email address or a catch all,
     following selection rules described in smtpd.conf(5), and the value is one or many recipients as
     described in aliases(5):

           user1                   otheruser
           user2@example.org       otheruser1,otheruser2
           @example.org            otheruser@example.com
           @                       catchall@example.com

TODO make an with file-db #t, auto convert the table into a berkley database via makemap

Currently opensmtpd-table-configuration, does not support mapping a user to 5 email addresses. For example, if user 'dave' can email as 'postmaster@gnu.org', and 'other@gnu.org', and 5 other email addresses... does not support this kind of mapping. To support it, I may be able to just embed a table in smtpd.conf, or I may need to create an /etc/aliases table as man 5 aliases describes.

TODO writing out the pkis when there are no pkis gives the string "\n"...it might be better to give "" instead

See man 5 table and man smtpd.conf

PROJ Can I make some improvements to my/sanitize procedure? [0/4]

how does my/sanitize procedure work?

(opensmtpd-configuration-fieldname->string example-opensmtpd-with-0-pkis opensmtpd-configuration-pkis opensmtpd-pki-configuration->string)

(my/sanitize var "record-name" "fieldname" '(string? boolean? number?)')

It is essentially asking? are you any of the following: string?, boolean?, number? If not, then error out with a helpful error message.

How does my hard-coded sanitized procedure work? eg opensmtpd-interface-filters

This hard coded sanitize is a little different than the my/sanitize procedure. I designed the thunk my/sanitize, such that each thunk (string?, false?, boolean?) has a corresponding entry in the procedure .

However, it would be nice to have the sanitize invocation in opensmtpd-interface-filters use a my/sanitize invocation like so.


(my/sanitize var "opensmtpd-interface" "filters"
             (list false?
                   '(list-has-duplicates-or-non-filters
                     "is a list in which each unique element is of type <opensmtpd-filter-configuration>\n"
                     "or <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration>.")
                   '(some-filters-in-list-need-message?
                     "<opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration> fieldname: 'decision' options "
                     "\"disconnect\" and \"reject\" require fieldname 'message'\n"
                     "to have a string.\n")
                   '(some-filters-in-list-need-value?
                     "<opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration> fieldname: 'decision' option "
                     "\"rewrite\" requires fieldname 'value'\n"
                     "to have a string.\n")))

PROJ better error messages for my/sanitize calls that use a lambda instead of a defined function [0/4]

THIS IS HARD TO DO... NOT DOING IT! I just chose to use a hard-coded error message baked into the lambda. I tried making my/sanitize better...but I could not get it to work. The hard-coded method just works:


(phase-name opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration-phase-name ;; string
              (default #f)
              (sanitize (lambda (var)
                          (if (and (string? var)
                                   (or (string=? "connect" var)
                                       (string=? "helo" var)
                                       (string=? "mail-from" var)
                                       (string=? "rcpt-to" var)
                                       (string=? "data" var)
                                       (string=? "commit" var)))
                              var
                              (begin
                                (display (string-append "<opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration> fieldname: 'phase-name' is of type "
                                                        "string.  The string can be either 'connect',"
                                                        " 'helo', 'mail-from', 'rcpt-to', 'data', or 'commit.'\n "))
                                (throw 'bad! var))))))

Why? <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration> fieldnames only accept certain strings. I want to sanitize each fieldname to make sure that it's strings is one of those strings. How would I do this?

For example, <opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration> fieldname 'decision' uses a lambda to sanitize itself. This will result in an error message that is descriptive enough to solve the problem. If I decide to do this, then I probably should create a non-exported record.


(opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration (name "cat") (phase-name "connect") (options "fcrdns") (decision "bypasse"))
(opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration (name "cat") (phase-name "connect") (options "fcrdns") (decision "bypasse"))
 fieldname 'bypasse' is of type.
#:972:0 (var)>
ice-9/boot-9.scm:1685:16: In procedure raise-exception:
Throw to key `bad!' with args `(#:972:0 (var)>)'.

A solution may be to modify the my/sanitize procedure to accept something like


(my/sanitize var "<record>" "'fieldname'" (list ((lambda (var) ...) . "list of unique numbers or strings")))

I have some example code here. It probably won't work, but it is a rough sketch of what could work.


[(eq? (cons? (car procedures)))
(cdr (car procedures))]

Entering a new prompt. Type `,bt' for a backtrace or `,q' to continue.

TODO Now make all the other sanitize sections that use a lambda use this new functionality:

eg:


(family opensmtpd-interface-family
          (default #f)
          (sanitize (lambda (var)
                      (cond
                       [(eq? #f var) ;; var == #f
                        var]
                       [(and (string? var)
                             (or (string=? "inet4" var)
                                 (string=? "inet6" var)))
                        var]
                       [else
                        (begin
                          (display "<opensmtpd-interface> fieldname 'family' must be string \"inet4\" or \"inet6\".\n")
                          (throw 'bad! var))]))))
TODO perhaps I can create an unexported record [0/2]
TODO Perhaps I could try to make my/sanitize work more like the opensmtpd-interface-filters does.

fieldnames: 'procedure', 'error message'.

It looks like tiny errors first. And shows you those relevent errors. When you fix those tiny errors it starts looking for harder errors.

This is nice because when you get something wrong in the config, you get the specific error message.

TODO the has lost of hard coded error checking.

TODO rework my/sanitize to be like opensmtpd-interface-filters

The way my/sanitize currently works, if you get one thing wrong, then you get 4 reasons for what you might have done wrong. It would be nice to hook this up to my/sanitize. Along with other bits of the code.

opensmtpd-interface-filters works like so:

Is the variable (not (false? var))

Is the variable (need-some-messages?)

Does the variable (need-some-value) ?

else var.

For example, this


(define-record-type* <opensmtpd-table-configuration>
  opensmtpd-table-configuration make-opensmtpd-table-configuration
  opensmtpd-table-configuration?
  this-record
  (name opensmtpd-table-configuration-name ;; string
        (default #f)
        (sanitize (lambda (var)
                    (my/sanitize var "opensmtpd-table-configuration" "name" (list string?)))))
  (file-db opensmtpd-table-configuration-file-db
           (default #f)
           (sanitize (lambda (var)
                       (my/sanitize var "opensmtpd-table-configuration" "file-db"
                                    (list boolean?)))))

would become:


(define-record-type* <opensmtpd-table-configuration>
  opensmtpd-table-configuration make-opensmtpd-table-configuration
  opensmtpd-table-configuration?
  this-record
  (name opensmtpd-table-configuration-name ;; string
        (default #f)
        (sanitize (lambda (var)
                    (my/sanitize var "opensmtpd-table-configuration" "name" (list not-string?)))))
  (file-db opensmtpd-table-configuration-file-db
           (default #f)
           (sanitize (lambda (var)
                       (my/sanitize var "opensmtpd-table-configuration" "file-db"
                                    (list not-boolean?)))))

This


(secure-connection opensmtpd-interface-secure-connection
                     (default #f)
                     (sanitize (lambda (var)
                                 (cond [(boolean? var)
                                        var]
                                       [(and (string? var)
                                             (string-in-list? var
                                                              (list "smtps" "tls"
                                                                    "tls-require"
                                                                    "tls-require-verify")))
                                        var]
                                       [else
                                        (begin
                                          (display (string-append "<opensmtd-listen-on> fieldname 'secure-connection' can be "
                                                                  "one of the following strings: \n'smtps', 'tls', 'tls-require', "
                                                                  "or 'tls-require-verify'.\n"))
                                          (throw 'bad! var))]))))

would become (finish this thought exercise.)


(secure-connection opensmtpd-interface-secure-connection
                     (default #f)
                     (sanitize (lambda (var)
                                 (list not-boolean
                                       (sanitize-proc-configuration
                                        string-in-list?
                                                        (list "smtps" "tls"
                                                              "tls-require"
                                                              "tls-require-verify"))
                                       [else
                                        (begin
                                          (display (string-append "<opensmtd-listen-on> fieldname 'secure-connection' can be "
                                                                  "one of the following strings: \n'smtps', 'tls', 'tls-require', "
                                                                  "or 'tls-require-verify'.\n"))
                                          (throw 'bad! var))]))))

PROJ can we merge my/sanitize syntax into (guix records)?


(define-record-type* <opensmtpd-option-configuration>
  opensmtpd-option-configuration make-opensmtpd-option-configuration
  opensmtpd-option-configuration?
  (documentation (list "<opensmtpd-match-configuration> uses <opensmtpd-option-configuration> to\n"
                       "tweak various options."))
  (sanitize (sanitize-configuration ; this sanitizes the whole <opensmtpd-option-configuration> record.
             (list (lambda (value)
                     ...
                     ))))
  (option opensmtpd-option-configuration-option
          (default #f)
          (sanitize (sanitize-configuration
                     (list string?))))
  (not opensmtpd-option-configuration-not
       (default #f)
       (sanitize (sanitize-configuration
                  (list boolean?)) ))
  (regex opensmtpd-option-configuration-regex
         (default #f)
         (sanitize (sanitize-configuration '(boolean?))))
  (value opensmtpd-option-configuration-value
         (default #f)
         (sanitize (sanitize-configuration
                    ;; note that it is smart enough to realize that opensmtpd-table-configuration? is a record,
                    ;; so the error message it returns is something like "<opensmtpd-match-configuration> fieldname is of
                    ;; type <opensmtpd-table-configuration>."
                    (list false? string? opensmtpd-table-configuration?)))))

TODO some of the error messages say "bad var #f". This is not very helpful.

PROJ add support for <listen-on>= fieldname 'senders': syntax "senders =<users> [masquerade]" [0/4]

TODO add a record type

    Where it is useful I should do a ~(throw 'bad! record)~ instead of ~(throw `bad! #f)~ :LOGBOOK:
  • State "TODO" from [2021-11-02 Tue 04:08]
  • :END:

TODO change the sanitize portion of the fieldname 'senders' in the

fieldnames: 'table (accepts '), and 'masquerade' (accepts boolean).

The below code does work in a REPL.


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

(opensmtpd-interface
 (auth
  (opensmtpd-table-configuration
   (name "My-table")
   (data '(("joshua" . "$some$Long$EncrytpedPassword"))))))

AND the below code will correctly result in an error!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

(opensmtpd-interface
 (auth
  (opensmtpd-table-configuration
   (name "My-table")
   (data '("joshua" "$some$Long$EncrytpedPassword")))))
~= fieldname: 'auth' is of type boolean, or an =~ record whose fieldname 'values' are an assoc-list
(eg: (opensmtpd-table-configuration (name "table") (data '("joshua" . "$encrypted$password")))).

TODO change relevant portions in opensmtpd-interface->string

This bit of code works in the repl too!


(add-to-load-path (dirname (current-filename)))
(use-modules (opensmtpd-records))

((@@ (opensmtpd-records) opensmtpd-interface->string)
 (opensmtpd-interface
  (auth
   (opensmtpd-table-configuration
    (name "credentials")
    (data '(("joshua" . "$someLongEncrytpedPassword")))))))

TODO support the masquerade option

TODO write out of examples of <opensmtpd-configuration> records that will fail to start or do not make sense.

Right now, senders just accepts an , but I am not allowing the user to turn on or off the masquerade option. Provide appropriate error messages.

There is a trend of guix services that "work" but are not dummy proof. For example, the XMPP service wants a cert in the format of "

Shepherd will not tell where the XMPP configuration file can be found. You have to manually go searching for the config file. Then you have to manually check the configuration syntax of the file, though the command to start the service may have a flag to check the syntax. Anyway it's annoying. Guix services should be able to get a <service-configuration> record and just by looking at the record tell, if you have done something silly that will make the service refuse to start or behave in a weird way, and provide you appropriate error messages so you don't have to go syntax hunting.

Examples:

  • could be a filter that is defined but never used, which won't
  • be possible once [[id:89603b3f-7580-4531-8aee-2c115c97adfe][remove opensmtpd-configuration-filters]] is done.
  • (listen-on (interface "doesNotExist"))
  • (smtp-configuration (smtp-max-message-size "10G")) Are you sure you
  • want emails that large?
  • (pki (domain "name") (key "notAKeyfile.txt") (cert
  • "notACertFile.txt")
  • (ca (file "NotACaFile.txt"))
  • (opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration (name "filter") (phase "helo") (decision "bypass"))
  • There is no fieldname =options= here. This has to be sanitized by ~~'s fieldname 'filters'.

(opensmtpd-interface
 (filters
  (list
   (opensmtpd-filter-phase-configuration
    (name "noFRDNS")
    (phase "commit")
    (options (list (opensmtpd-option-configuration
                    (option "fcrdns")
                    )))
    (decision "junk")))))

Some notes on working on the service workflows and such

disabling centaur-tabs-mode seems to help. and NOT working in the console helps too.

I think that having the geiser repl running via

M-x geiser M-x geiser-load-file RET opensmtpd-records.scm ,m (opensmtpd-records)

May be causing Emacs to move slowly after a while.

It may be better to instead do:

cd prog/gnu/guix-config/linode-system-configuration; guile -L . --listen=9999

And then in Emacs (as described here: https://www.nongnu.org/geiser/geiser_3.html) connect to the external repl via M-x geiser-connect